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Old 05-21-2019, 05:30 PM   #1
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Most Home Run-Friendly Ballpark of All Time?

I'm trying to set up a sim with the Yankees and their glut of home run hitters. What I want to do is use silvam14's ballparks to create the best possible conditions in which to hit home runs. Is there any way to find data showing which ballpark has historically been the most home run-friendly? Thanks in advance for any help.
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Old 05-21-2019, 05:44 PM   #2
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Maybe Colorado at some point in the steroid era?
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Old 05-21-2019, 06:28 PM   #3
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Hughes Stadium in Sacramento (70s park) where the old Solons played was a ^^^^^^^ abomination with a LF wall that I could still hit one over, and a RF wall that seemed to be somewhere just outside the orbit of Mars.

Read and giggle: http://baseballoddball.blogspot.com/...s-stadium.html
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Old 05-21-2019, 06:59 PM   #4
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I don't know how well silvam14's ballparks or even OOTP would do this, but the most home run friendly part of all time was Lake Front Park in Chicago, for the Cubs (at that time called the White Stockings) in 1884.

The right field line was 196 feet from home. Through 1883, they had a ground rule that hitting the ball over that wall was a double. So the Chicago squad regularly led the league in doubles.

In 1884, they changed the ground rules from being a double to a home run.

With largely the same hitters, they went from 13 home runs in 1883 to 142 in 1884. That's a 1,092% increase.

After the season, the National League set that fences had to be a minimum of 210 feet from home plate.

The Cubs had to move following 1884, since the city was reclaiming the land. They played in two separate parks called "West Side Park" before eventually moving into the ballpark built for the Chicago Whales - Weeghman Park, which was renamed Wrigley.
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Old 05-21-2019, 08:55 PM   #5
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If I had to guess, in MLB in the 20th century, it was probably the old Baker Bowl in Philadelphia. A good place to start looking would be the Seamheads Ballpark Database. Scroll down to the bottom of the page for the downloadable version.

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Old 05-22-2019, 02:53 AM   #6
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Courtesy of Baseball Prospectus. A few candidates. Fulton-County Stadium from 1978-1982 and Coors Field from 1995-1998 seem like very viable options.

Atlanta Fulton-County Stadium for Atlanta in 1978: 164 HR Factor for RHB, 131 for LHB. 1982 had 162 and 126 IIRC.
Kingdome for Seattle in 1980: 158 HR Factor for RHB, 126 for LHB
Coors Field for Colorado in 1995: 154 HR Factor for RHB, 121 for LHB
Coors Field for Colorado in 1999: 136 HR Factor for LHB, 135 for RHB
Riverfront Stadium for Cincinnati in 1980: 191 HR Factor for LHB(!), 108 for RHB
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Old 05-22-2019, 07:41 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BMW View Post
I don't know how well silvam14's ballparks or even OOTP would do this, but the most home run friendly part of all time was Lake Front Park in Chicago, for the Cubs (at that time called the White Stockings) in 1884.

The right field line was 196 feet from home. Through 1883, they had a ground rule that hitting the ball over that wall was a double. So the Chicago squad regularly led the league in doubles.

In 1884, they changed the ground rules from being a double to a home run.

With largely the same hitters, they went from 13 home runs in 1883 to 142 in 1884. That's a 1,092% increase.

After the season, the National League set that fences had to be a minimum of 210 feet from home plate.

The Cubs had to move following 1884, since the city was reclaiming the land. They played in two separate parks called "West Side Park" before eventually moving into the ballpark built for the Chicago Whales - Weeghman Park, which was renamed Wrigley.
I looked up the sites of old Chicago ballparks a little while ago since I live here now and Lake Front Park appears to have sat on the corner of Michigan and Randolph, about where the Bean sits today, although that area is also newer land built up over train tracks which, if they are situated in the same place they were back then, would make the real estate for that park *crazy* small. I also think Michigan wasnít nearly as wide as it is now... you could just about fit a ballpark there if you didnít care too much about the outfield being right sized.

There was an earlier park there that was destroyed by the Chicago Fire.
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Old 05-22-2019, 12:26 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by Syd Thrift View Post
I looked up the sites of old Chicago ballparks a little while ago since I live here now and Lake Front Park appears to have sat on the corner of Michigan and Randolph, about where the Bean sits today, although that area is also newer land built up over train tracks which, if they are situated in the same place they were back then, would make the real estate for that park *crazy* small. I also think Michigan wasnít nearly as wide as it is now... you could just about fit a ballpark there if you didnít care too much about the outfield being right sized.

There was an earlier park there that was destroyed by the Chicago Fire.
Yeah, I love these aspects of pro sports that grew organically. Not artificially. They had a plot of land they they could do sports on. It was small so they just build what could fit.
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Old 05-23-2019, 03:45 PM   #9
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Yeah, for more funsies, after the 1884 season the Cubs (then the White Stockings) moved to a place on the South Side not too far away from where Obama lives now, then they moved to a different location on the South Side for a couple of years before they decided they wanted to play games on Sunday (which was not allowed in their then-current environs) so they packed up and played on the west side of the Loop for 20ish years before finally moving into Wrigley. That second South Side park was the site where Comiskey Park was later built.

I don't know, it's kind of fascinating to me the way that there are so many places across the city that housed pro baseball at one time or another, many with little to no sign that this ever happened. Heck, there was this massive World's Fair type exhibition here in 1893 and the only things that are really left from *that* are a couple of museum buildings (which had to be rebuilt to concrete from their original terra cotta) and a large park conspicuously designed to look like it was there all along.
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