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Old 01-13-2013, 08:02 PM   #1
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RoyalsBlue 1871-2012 - replay

Well, I ran a sim replay of the MLB, letting the rookies debut during their correct year but being drafted instead of going to their RL teams. At some point I will begin a dynasty offline with the Royals in this league, but for the moment I'm going through the 140 plus seasons to gain a little perspective on how things went down.

The winningest franchise, at least in terms of championships won, is the Boston Red Sox with 13 titles, followed by the Chicago Cubs with 10 and Baltimore, Detroit, Pittsburgh and San Francisco with 9. Pittsburgh has been in the playoffs the most, 29 times followed by Boston (27), Los Angeles Dodgers (26), Detroit (25) and New York Yankees (24).

There are several teams that have yet to savor the feeling of being a champion and they are Arizona, Florida, Kansas City, Milwaukee, Tampa Bay, Texas and Toronto. The Brewers have made it to the playoffs 7 times without winning the big one, but both Arizona and Kansas City haven't even made it to the playoffs yet.

The worst seasons ever in term of team losses are both over 120 losses as the 1961 Washington Senators went 40-122 and the 1962 New York Mets went 41-121. At least they are only in the top 6 once apiece. The Kansas City Royals, easily the worst team overall in this replay, have two of the top 6 worst seasons of all time with 116 losses in 2006 and 115 losses in 1974.

The best hitter of all time spent his entire 24 year career with the Cincinnati Reds and his name was Travis Jackson. He's the all time leader in games (3424), at bats (13325), runs (2103), hits (4060), total bases (5951) and singles (2973). He was also 4th in doubles (592) and 3rd in rbi (1915).

The best pitcher of all time, Charlie Sweeney, was a member of the Boston Americans (later Red Sox) and he too spent his entire career with this one team, a total of 22 years from 1882 through 1906. He had the most wins and losses (459-421), most games started (933), most complete games (677), most innings pitched (7754.1) and was a whopping 282.1 WAR for his career. He held the top spot for strikeouts (4200) until he was passed in the early 1960's by Hal Newhouser, who still holds the lead today (4290).

Next up a profile of a few of my favorite players growing up (George Brett, Frank White, Ozzie Smith) and then I'll just start throwing random things out there, so if there's someone you want to hear how they did, just let me know.

Thanks for reading!
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Old 01-13-2013, 11:20 PM   #2
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The best pitcher of all time was a member of the Boston Americans (later Red Sox) and he too spent his entire career with this one team, a total of 22 years from 1882 through 1906. He had the most wins and losses (459-421), most games started (933), most complete games (677), most innings pitched (7754.1) and was a whopping 282.1 WAR for his career. He held the top spot for strikeouts (4200) until he was passed in the early 1960's by Hal Newhouser, who still holds the lead today (4290).
Who was he.
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Old 01-14-2013, 06:57 AM   #3
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Who was he.
Obviously, he was the man with no name! :facepalm: Thanks for catching that, Scott.

The pitcher in question was Charlie Sweeney. The Charlie Sweeney award doesn't quite have the same ring as Cy Young though, does it?
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Old 01-16-2013, 09:00 PM   #4
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What time period did your best hitter (Travis Jackson) play in?
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Old 01-16-2013, 10:04 PM   #5
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What time period did your best hitter (Travis Jackson) play in?
Travis Jackson played from 1922 through 1946.

IRL, he played for the NY Giants from 1922 through 1936 and was a pretty solid player, even topping 20 hrs once (21) in 1929 and 100 rbi once (101) in 1934. A career .291 hitter with 135 hr and 929 rbi in his 15 seasons, generally starting at SS for the majority of his career and a little time at 3B.
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Old 01-27-2013, 11:40 AM   #6
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IRL, George Brett is the unquestioned face of the Kansas City Royals. He is the team leader is nearly every career offensive category and was well known for his all out, ultra competitive style of play that actually cost him over 3 full seasons of play with the injuries that he piled up in his 21 year career. A thirteen time All-Star, Brett nearly hit .400 in his magical 1980 season before finishing at a mind-boggling .390 as he won the AL MVP that season while the Royals made their first trip to the World Series, falling in six games to the Philadelphia Phillies.

However, it was his 1985 season that is widely considered to be his finest all around year as he smacked 30 homers and won the AL 3B Gold Glove while leading the Royals back from 3-1 deficits in both the ALCS against the Toronto Blue Jays and the World Series against their cross-state rival St. Louis Cardinals, managed by former KC skipper Whitey Herzog.

In 1992, Brett collected his 3000th hit in front of friends and family in Southern California as the Royals played the Angels, collecting 4 hits in one game to reach the magical milestone. Brett retired after the 1993 season and upon eligibility was elected into the Baseball Hall of Fame on the first ballot with a whopping 98.4 percent of the votes.

To say the replay was a disappointment for fans of George Brett like me would be like saying the Taj Mahal is a nice building; it's a severe understatement. In this history, George was drafted by the Detroit Tigers and spent his entire 10 year career in the Motor City.

1977 was his finest season in this history as he bombed 25 homers and knocked in 117 runs. In 1978 he was awarded the AL 3B Gold Glove and he was a member of the 1982 Tigers squad that downed the Pittsburgh Pirates for their first World Series victory in Motown since 1964.

Injuries in this history were a factor as in real life, but after the 1983 season Brett was released by the Tigers and was not picked up and subsequently retired after the 1989 season. All in all, the replay was not kind to George Brett.
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Old 02-01-2013, 04:10 PM   #7
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I like this idea and I'm thinking of trying something similar. How did Dale Murphy turn out?
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Old 02-02-2013, 12:01 PM   #8
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I like this idea and I'm thinking of trying something similar. How did Dale Murphy turn out?
Thanks, PotatoPeeler!

In this history, Dale Murphy would have to be considered a disappointment, much as George Brett was.

Drafted by the St. Louis Cardinals in 1975, the hulking catcher was unable to come to an agreement with the Redbirds and went back into the first year player draft for 1976 where he was drafted and signed by the Oakland Athletics.

No position change this time for the mild-mannnered Murphy as he spent his entire 11 plus seasons donning the tools of ignorance, but doing so as a backup catcher for the A's, Angels and Brewers.

Murphy only garnered a total of 1537 AB's in his 11 plus major league seasons, only managing to get 358 hits and 44 HR before retiring with a meager .233 lifetime batting average.

Clearly used as a part-time player throughout the entirety of his career, Murphy never managed as many as 300 at bats in any one season, only coming close once with 298 AB's in 1980 after A's starting catcher Alan Ashby signed with the Expos as a free agent following the 1979 season. Dale's .657 OPS wasn't exactly what the A's were looking for and the next season saw Bob Brenly as the starter behind the plate relegating Dale to backup status once again.

All in all, it wasn't a good career in this replay for Murphy as he wasted his talents as a backup catcher and was never really given a chance other than the 1980 season which really hamstrung him with Oakland.
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Old 02-02-2013, 02:57 PM   #9
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Love this kind of thing. I did my own 1871-end of 2011 replay through simming, and I've studied so much into it I treat it practically as if it were real life. Maybe one day I'll post it to the forums.

How did Cal Ripken do?
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Old 02-10-2013, 01:51 AM   #10
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How long does it take to run A sim like this?
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Old 02-10-2013, 08:47 AM   #11
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IRL, George Brett is the unquestioned face of the Kansas City Royals. He is the team leader is nearly every career offensive category and was well known for his all out, ultra competitive style of play that actually cost him over 3 full seasons of play with the injuries that he piled up in his 21 year career.
Unfortunately, MLB Network and a lot of other baseball info outlets seem to think the only thing he ever did was put pine tar on his bat. Batting .390 with 24 homers while playing half your games in the pinball machine at Royals Stadium is really something. Never really had a bad season in his career, either... kind of like Musial or Williams that way.

Sorry he didn't become a Royal for you; I freely admit I would have probably assigned him to KC when he came along Your self-control is much greater than mine!
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Old 02-10-2013, 11:43 AM   #12
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Love this kind of thing. I did my own 1871-end of 2011 replay through simming, and I've studied so much into it I treat it practically as if it were real life. Maybe one day I'll post it to the forums.

How did Cal Ripken do?
I do the same, dynaboyj...it can become quite engrossing.

The Iron Man was drafted by the Houston Astros in 1980 and spent his first seven seasons with the Astros, winning the NL gold glove at shortstop in both 1981 and 1986. After the 1987 season, he signed a minor league free agent contract with the Dodgers then was out of baseball from 1989 through 1992 before resurfacing with the Orioles in 1993, as a utility infielder.

From 94 through 96 he played as a backup for the Phillies, Indians, and Red Sox before finally retiring after the 1996 season.

Overall, Cal only had just over 3900 at bats in the majors and was a career .245 hitter. Not once did the real life Iron Man ever play a complete 162 game season in this replay.

Again, this career would have to be termed a disappointment in comparison to real life, but I guess I should have changed the settings if I wanted a "true replay" to get similar results to our MLB.

It's good to see another possibility of how things could have gone though!
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Old 02-10-2013, 11:48 AM   #13
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How long does it take to run A sim like this?
I ran it overnight Jrockne, but I don't think it took the entire night. A lot of it depends on how often you have it set up to save and how much detail you want. The more information you save (box scores, game logs, etc) will make it take longer and of course how much memory/ram/etc you have on your computer.

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Unfortunately, MLB Network and a lot of other baseball info outlets seem to think the only thing he ever did was put pine tar on his bat. Batting .390 with 24 homers while playing half your games in the pinball machine at Royals Stadium is really something. Never really had a bad season in his career, either... kind of like Musial or Williams that way.

Sorry he didn't become a Royal for you; I freely admit I would have probably assigned him to KC when he came along Your self-control is much greater than mine!
I was bummed, GM, but I really didn't have a whole lot of self-control to be honest. Like I said above, I ran it overnight. Maybe I'll do it again and have the rookies drafted to their original teams and recalculate differently.
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Old 02-10-2013, 01:19 PM   #14
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Random tidbits throughout this replay

In 2010, Joe Mauer became the first person to bat .400 in a season (.408) since Lou Gehrig hit .404 in 1927. The highest all time single season batting average of .421 was set by Candy LaChance in 1894. The first .400 hitter after the turn of the 20th century was Rogers Hornsby with .406 in 1924. There are 7 hitters who have surpassed the magical .400 mark (Mauer, LaChance, Gehrig, Hornsby, Tuck Turner .410 in 1894, Wee Willie Keeler .407 in 1894, and Jesse Burkett .409 in 1895) and 5 are in the Hall of Fame. Only Mauer, who is still active, and Candy LaChance are not enshrined.

Ted Williams has the distinction of hitting the most homers in a single season with 62, but three players have each hit 61 (Mark McGwire in 1987, Francisco Cabrera in 1994 and Prince Fielder in 2007). Cabrera, in fact, also hit 60 in 1993 and slammed another 58 in 1999 and another 53 in 2000. Fielder has been knocking on the door as well hitting 58 in 2009, 56 in 2008, 54 in 2010, and 53 in both 2006 and 2012. The first man to ever hit 50 homers in a season was Lou Gehrig with 53 in 1931 and that was the record until Williams blew by him in 1942.

No one has ever hit 4 homers in a game. The most recent to hit 3 in a game was done by Seattle's Bobby Crosby against the Los Angeles Angels on 31-Aug-2012. The very first hitter to club 3 homers in a game was Pittsburgh's Earl Smith against the Cincinnati Reds on 24-June-1922.

The most hits in one game was done by Florida's John Olerud on 14-April-1995 as he went 7 for 7 against the San Diego Padres. This was his first season with the Marlins after sigining a free agent deal after the 1994 season. Olerud was drafted by Kansas City and spent his first six seasons with the Royals.

There have been 13 perfect games tossed in this replay, the most recent by Russ Ortiz on 04-August-2010 for the Cardinals as he struck out 7 Houston Astros.

The longest hitting streak orf 42 consecutive games this go around is in the hands of two men, Boston Beaneaters right fielder George Van Haltren who was the first man to string them together in 1893 and New York Yankees first sacker Jim Bottomley who matched the feat in 1922. There are only two others to reach 40 games with consecutive hits and they are the Boston Braves' shortstop Rogers Hornsby with 41 in 1924 and New York Giants' left fielder Goose Goslin with 40 in 1931.
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Old 02-11-2013, 02:45 AM   #15
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Ted Williams has the distinction of hitting the most homers in a single season with 62, but three players have each hit 61 (Mark McGwire in 1987, Francisco Cabrera in 1994 and Prince Fielder in 2007). Cabrera, in fact, also hit 60 in 1993 and slammed another 58 in 1999 and another 53 in 2000. Fielder has been knocking on the door as well hitting 58 in 2009, 56 in 2008, 54 in 2010, and 53 in both 2006 and 2012. The first man to ever hit 50 homers in a season was Lou Gehrig with 53 in 1931 and that was the record until Williams blew by him in 1942.
Mark McGwire could hit home runs before steroids? Tell me more about this version's McGwire.
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Old 02-18-2013, 11:52 PM   #16
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Curious about a few players. Christy Mathewson, Ty Cobb, Babe Ruth, Lou Gehrig, Dizzy Dean, Micky Mantle, Pete Rose and Barry Bonds.
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Old 02-20-2013, 12:15 AM   #17
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Curious about Babe Ruth too. Did you keep him a pitcher?
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Old 02-20-2013, 11:20 PM   #18
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Mark McGwire could hit home runs before steroids? Tell me more about this version's McGwire.
Yep, Mr. Androstenedione was a true power hitter from his rookie season in 1986 through his last "full" season in 1995 before becoming a pinch hitter type for his final two seasons with the Rockies.

Mark was drafted by the Expos and blasted 36 homers in his rookie season for Montreal, but he was only getting started as his sophomore season saw him knocking on the all time single season homer record before falling one short at 61 while getting voted to the first of four All Star appearances.

McGwire averaged 42 homers per full season for the Expos before being traded to the Indians during his 6th season along with Jeff Conine for Rich Dauer. Not real sure what the Expos front office was thinking with that move.

Mark didn't re-sign with the Indians, but instead became a fixture in the middle of the Toronto lineup for the next four seasons, only missing 5 games combined in his first three seasons in his other Canadian stop, again averaging over 40 homers per year, highlighted by 55 taters and 148 rbi in the 1994 season.

1995 saw the breakdown of McGwire begin as he missed a quarter of the season due to various ailments. After Toronto released him, he was reduced to a bit player where he was finally a member of a championship team with the Rockies in 1997.

Big Mac bombed 388 homers and knocked in 1063 rbi in his 12 seasons while compiling a lifetime .243/.342/.503. All in all a pretty decent career, but on the outside looking in as far as the HOF goes.
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Old 02-21-2013, 07:44 PM   #19
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Curious about a few players. Christy Mathewson, Ty Cobb, Babe Ruth, Lou Gehrig, Dizzy Dean, Micky Mantle, Pete Rose and Barry Bonds.
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Curious about Babe Ruth too. Did you keep him a pitcher?
Babe Ruth spent his entire 25 year career with the Pittsburgh Pirates and was inducted into the HOF on his first year of eligibility after notching 300 wins, just over 5000 innings pitched while still blasting 80 homers. In fact, he was 5th in the league in homers with 11 in 1920.

Ruth was also the 1914 Rookie of the Year and 1924 Pitcher of the Year while also garnering two player of the week awards and a pair of pitcher of the month awards as well during his career.

****------****

Christy Mathewson wound up a pedestrian 152-148 for his 15 year career splitting time with both the Philadelphia Athletics and the St. Louis Cardinals. Things started off well for Christy after winning 12 games and being named the 1900 AL Rookie of the Year. Unfortunately for the strapping righthander, his performance was up and down and several times throughout the years he missed 4 months or more due to injuries. Twice he won as many as 20 games in a season, but over his final 4 seasons, he never appeared in more than 7 games in a year before retiring after the 1917 season.

****-----****

Ty Cobb spent his entire 23 year career as a member of the Philadelphia Phillies after being selected number 2 overall in the 1904 amateur draft. Along with a 1905 Rookie of the Year award, the notoriously competitive outfielder was awarded the Silver Slugger Award as the NL's best hitter 4 different times, earned an Outfield Gold Glove 8 different times along with being named NL Player of the Week a whopping 31 times in his career.

The Georgia Peach wound up amassing only 3423 hits in comparison to real life, but that is still good enough for 4th place all-time in this replay, trailing only Travis Jackson (4060), Gene Demontreville (3448) and John McGraw (3431). Cobb was inducted into the HOF in 1933, his first year of eligibility.

I'll continue with the rest of the list shortly. Hope you've enjoyed thus far!
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