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TBCB Inside the Ropes Your game and fantasy fights

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Old 10-24-2019, 01:51 PM   #1341
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No Excel ...

Everything (well, almost everything) is done manually. Use the Cubedrum method, rolling percentile dice, to determine when a fighter will fight next (on a monthly basis). Use the PP (calculated by the computerized game system) for the rankings, however.
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Old 10-24-2019, 03:15 PM   #1342
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And how do you decide who fights when? I use a similar system where I go through all fighters each month to check, 25% in the next month, 35% 2 months inactivity and so on...
You decide beforehand which fighters will fight in which month?
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Old 10-29-2019, 12:36 AM   #1343
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I Use a Similar Method ...

It's the Cubedrum method -- at least that's the person who posted it first, now many moons ago, even before the more recent iteration with auto-aging or whatever came out. Knockdowns, cuts, swelling, TKO losses, injuries, all these things means a fighter must rest a certain amount of time and then, once the target time for return is set, it comes down to a percentile dice roll. And, yes, for established fighters (past Pre-Prime), it's 25% for the first month, +10% each month thereafter but, for fighters at Beginner and Pre-Prime, it's 40% for the first month, +10% each month thereafter. Sounds like it's similar or almost the same as what you have been using.
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Old 10-30-2019, 10:15 AM   #1344
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Oct. 1942, Part 2 of 2

This report covers a total of 55 bouts taking place during the second half of October 1942. Two WBA title bouts are included in this report.

Oct. 17, 1942: Next fight card takes place at Denver’s Mammoth Gardens. Featured is a bout for the USBA LW title, with Willie Joyce defending that belt against Sammy “Clutch” Angott. The two have not met before. With two boxers squaring off, it’s a tactical, defensive battle. The bout remains close through the opening four rounds, before Joyce takes charge with a big round in round five. By the end of round five, there is noticeable puffiness under the left eye of the challenger. At the midway point, the unofficial card has Angott ahead (by a count of 59-55) – which is a bit surprising given that the punches landed stats show a very slight edge for Joyce. The outcome remains in doubt into the final few rounds, with Joyce taking the initiative, pressing the action and connecting with a big left early in round 11, rocking Angott and causing the challenger to cover up. The bout goes the rest of the way without incident and, in the end, it’s a two-for-one SD 12 verdict favoring Angott (115-114, 114-115, 115-114), a result that does not go over well with the fight fans in attendance. Nonetheless, the belt changes hands. Post-bout records: Angott, 25-5-5 (9); Joyce, 22-3-3 (12).

Oct. 23, 1942: Next is a Friday night card at the Rand Stadium in Johannesburg, a venue that has become more widely used as a meeting place for those fighters unable to meet elsewhere due to the political situation given the current war status. It is a limited card (only five bouts) and is headlined with a non-title LH bout matching EBU LH Champ Adolf Heuser and Harry “Kid” Matthews. First meeting of the two, and tough matchup for Matthews, who has lost just once in 21 prior outings. Not much in the way of action until early in round five, when Matthews connects with a cross to the head, flooring his German opponent. Heuser arises at the count of eight and then attempts to cover up. However, Matthews’ killer instinct has kicked in, and he follows up with a hook for a second KD, and then a combination in the final seconds of the round end the bout via the three-knockdown rule. An impressive TKO 5 win for Matthews, running his career record to 21-1 (16). The loss drops Heuser to 41-12-2 (19). With the win, Matthews moves into the top 10 in the LH rankings.

Oct. 24, 1942: The scene shifts to London for the next fight card, at the Olympia. Only bout of note is the main event, which matches the Commonwealth HW Champion, Tommy Martin, “the British Brown Bomber,” with Nathan Mann, a top 20 American HW contender. This is a rematch of a 1941 encounter, which ended in a draw. This time around, Martin is on target early, decking Mann with a hard cross in the opening round. However, Mann recovers quickly, and he manages to bloody Martin’s nose in an action-packed opening stanza. Late in round five, Martin connects for a second KD but Mann is able to quickly scramble to his feet; at the midway point, in spite of the two knockdowns, the unofficial card has the bout even (47-47) due to the fact that Mann maintains a solid lead in the punches landed category. Into the later rounds, both men begin to tire and Martin, still dealing with the flow of blood from his nose, tries to become more aggressive. However, in round eight, the cut becomes too problematic to allow the bout to continue and Mann, despite the two KDs, manages to walk away a TKO 8 winner on the cuts stoppage. A peek at the judges’ scorecards showed a slim one-point lead for Mann (66-65) on all three cards. Post-bout career marks: Mann, 25-8-3 (20); Martin, 29-12-3 (17).

Oct. 24, 1942: Next is a huge card at New York City’s Yankee Stadium, with a WBA title bout as the big draw. Top young talent such as Rocky Graziano and Jake LaMotta give creditable performances on the undercard. The main supporting bout has former WBA LW Champ Tony “the Roman Warrior” Canzoneri moving up to test his mettle in the WW division, taking on ranked WW veteran Freddie “Red” Cochrane. As it is the first meeting of these two, there is a long feeling out process that takes the duo through the opening few rounds. After a big round in round five, the unofficial scorer at ringside has Cochrane with a narrow lead (48-47) at the halfway point of the bout. Sensing that he is falling behind, Canzoneri’s corner urges him to pick up the pace and go on the offense in the later rounds, but the aging veteran shows signs of fatigue and is unable to mount an effective rally. The bout goes the distance, but the scoring is very close; in fact, it is a SD 10 for Cochrane (97-95, 95-96, 97-95), as one judge held out to score the bout in favor of the ex-Champion. The win lifts Cochrane to 30-8-4 (8). The loss leaves Canzoneri, who is nearing the end of a long and illustrious career, at 54-8-4 (17). Then, in the main event, the WBA MW title is on the line, as Holman Williams, who captured the belt in early 1942, defeating Tony Zale and following up with an impressive win over Henry Armstrong, faces veteran MW contender Jock McAvoy, the “Rochdale Thunderbolt, the reigning GBU MW titleholder who is the longest reigning current Champion (over 12 years) in this Universe. No prior meetings and, for McAvoy, it is only his second WBA title try; he fell short some seven years earlier, in 1935, against Jack McVey. Williams gets off to a strong start, winning the first two rounds, but both men are marked: Williams, with a puffy left eye and McAvoy, with a rapidly swelling right eye. With little in the way of resistance, Williams manages to build an early points lead after the first five rounds (48-47, according to the unofficial card, although the punches landed stats show Williams with a much larger advantage). In the middle rounds, both men are amenable to exchanging blows on the inside, although McAvoy is beginning to show signs of fatigue as Williams looks to be the superior fighter. After 10, the tide had swung clearly in Williams’ favor (by a unofficial count of 97-93). The bout comes to a sudden but unsurprising end in round 12 when Williams rips open a severe cut over the badly swollen right eye of the challenger. After consulting with the ring doctor, the ref calls an immediate halt, and the bout goes down as a TKO 12 to Williams. Post-bout records: Williams, 40-8 (21); McAvoy, 37-18-6 (25). Sadly, this turned out to be McAvoy’s final bout at Prime career stage.

Oct. 30, 1942: To the West Coast for a Friday night card at Seattle’s Sicks Stadium. Featured in the main event is veteran MW, Freddie Steele, “the Tacoma Assassin,” a former WBA MW Champion now on the downside of his career, but still ranked among the top five MWs. Steele’s opponent is Cuba’s Kid Tunero, a former LABF MW Champ; unlike Steele, Tunero is still in Prime condition. However, Steele has emerged the victor in all three prior bouts, although their most recent encounter was back in 1938. Through the opening rounds, Steele’s age begins to show, as Tunero piles up an early points lead while Steele sports a puffy left eye for all his efforts. At the midway point, Tunero is well ahead (by 50-45) on the unofficial card. It is more of the same in the second half of the with Steele growing more and more frustrated at his inability to recreate the success he had in the earlier bouts versus the Cuban. Tunero coasts to the points win, taking the UD 10 (99-92, 97-94, 97-94); the win runs his career totals to 36-15-5 (10). The loss drops Steele to 52-10-1 (36). The result of the bout seemed a bit ironic since Tunero, at 32, was the older of the two but Steele looked much older and more shopworn of the two in this outing.

Oct. 31, 1942: The month wraps with a card in Panama City, highlighted by a WBA BW title clash. Newly crowned Champ Manuel Ortiz defends against four-time ex-Champ Panama Al Brown before a raucous fight crowd at Brown’s home town. The two have met once before, back in June, with Ortiz taking a controversial split decision en route to the title, embarrassing the veteran Brown before his hometown fans. In this rematch, there is not much to choose between the two through the opening two rounds. In round three, Brown moves inside, becoming the aggressor and scoring some points with the judges and, certainly, with the crowd that roars with every punch landed by their favorite. After a relatively even fourth round, there is a flurry of blows exchanged on the inside in round five; these exchanges also favor the ex-Champ, Brown, who pulls slightly ahead on the unofficial card (48-47) at this point. Round six is Ortiz’s best round thus far, as he lands repeatedly and causes some initial swelling to appear around the left eye of Panama Al. Brown rebounds to win round seven, and the eighth round falls in the “too close to call” category as neither man is able to assert control. The bout remains close into the later rounds; at the two-thirds point, the unofficial scorecard still has the challenger, Brown, clinging to a narrow one-point lead (96-95). A big question, however, is whether or not the 14-year age difference is taking a toll on the older fighter (Brown). After another good round for Ortiz in round 11, Brown is back in charge in round 12. Into the final few rounds and, with both men exhausted, Brown goes on the attack, while Ortiz (who holds a slight edge in the punches landed stat) chooses to lay back, staying on the outside. After another good showing by Brown in round 13, Ortiz switches tactics and becomes more aggressive in round 14. After another close round and, with the crowd on its feet and title hanging in the balance, the fighters touch glove for the 15th and final round. Both men land some good shots, but the Ortiz landed more. The bout goes to decision and, to the delight of the Panamanian fight fans, the judges find Brown the winner, via a MD 15 (114-142, 143-143, 144-142). The 40-year old veteran lifts the WBA BW belt for the fifth time in his career, avenging the earlier loss and improving his career record to 68-14-2 (25), while the loss leaves Ortiz at 20-4-1 (13).
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Old 11-22-2019, 05:36 PM   #1345
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Nov. 1942, Part 1 of 2

This report covers a total of 54 bouts taking place during the first half of November 1942. One WBA title bout is included in this report. I should note that one of the bouts reported here – not a title bout, produced one of the more shocking upset decisions in recent memory, so much to the effect that I had already written it up as a decision when for one fighter when I hit the “results” button on the computer and found out that the judges had gone the other way!

Nov. 6, 194
2: The month commences with a Friday night card at Syracuse’s War Memorial Auditorium. In the feature, top five FW contender Petey Scalzo faces Jimmy Perrin in a 10-round, non-title affair. The two have not met previously. Scalzo is on the comeback trail, after having lost the WBA FW title to Everett Rightmire; likewise, Scalzo is looking to rebound from a shocking first-round KO loss to Joey Iannotti. In the second round, Perrin’s progress is slowed by a cut under his right eye. It takes several rounds for Perrin’s corner to staunch the bleeding. At the halfway point, it is a two-point edge for Scalzo (49-47, according to the unofficial card). However, the bout is destined to end less than a round later, as Scalzo begins to assert himself, landing some punishing blows that do even more damage, causing the injured right eye of Perrin to puff up. Finally, with seconds remaining in the round, the ref has seen enough and steps in to call a halt. TKO 6 for Scalzo, running his career record to an impressive 24-3-2 (14). The loss leaves Perrin at 24-10-4 (9).

Nov. 7, 1942: Next fistic action takes place at the Rand Stadium in Johannesburg. Topping the card are a pair of LW bouts, including one for the Commonwealth title belt. But, first is a solid supporting bout matching the “Sweetwater Swatter,” Lew Jenkins, a former USBA LW Champ, with reigning EBU LW titleholder Aldo Spoldi. The two have not met before, but the action heats up late in round one when Jenkins connects with a wild overhand right to send Spoldi to the canvas. The Italian Champion quickly recovers, and he rallies with a strong showing in round two. However, late in round three, Jenkins strikes again, and Spoldi takes a second trip to the canvas, once again bouncing back on his feet to continue the bout. At the midway point, Jenkins is up on the official card (49-46) by virtue of the two KDs, but there is also some initial swelling around the right eye of the American fighter, so Spoldi still has hope of overcoming the points deficit. Into the later rounds, and Spoldi is the aggressor as he gradually chips away at Jenkins’ perceived points lead. Meanwhile, the actual punches landed stats favor the Italian. Jenkins, who has been staying on the outside, battles back with some sharp aggressive tactics to win round nine. Then, midway through the final round, Spoldi breaks through, and Jenkins takes a tumble to the deck. While Jenkins is able to regain his footing, Spoldi follows up with a second KD, then lands a couple of more unanswered blows, and the ref steps in to save Jenkins from further punishment. TKO 10 for Spoldi. Post-bout records: Spoldi, 43-10-5 (17); Jenkins, 26-3-3 (12). A peek at the scorecards at the time of the stoppage showed Jenkins with a narrow one-point lead on two of the three (but this did not take into account Spoldi’s dominant performance in round 10). After this bout, it is time for the feature, with South Africa’s own Laurie Stevens puts his Commonwealth LW title belt on the line, facing challenger Dave Castilloux. Second meeting of the two, with Stevens scoring a fifth round KO over the Canadian in Vancouver back in 1939. This time around, it is a cautious start by both men; Then, midway through round four, a short, clean hook from Stevens gets through, and Castilloux sinks to the canvas, taking an eight count before arising. Castilloux covers up to last the round and continues to battle back and, at the midway point of the bout, the unofficial scorer has it even (57-57). A couple of good rounds in rounds seven and eight, and Castilloux is back in contention, forcing Stevens to become more aggressive. Suffering from a bloody nose and a swollen right eye, Stevens goes on the offensive in round nine, but his timing is off on his punches as he meets some stiff resistance from Castilloux. In round 10, he rocks the Canadian challenger with a straight right, but Castilloux covers up to survive the onslaught. The final few rounds see both men exhausted, with Stevens taking the fight to Castilloux as he desperately seeks to hold on to the belt. The bout goes the distance, and Castilloux takes the final rounds to secure a UD 12 (116-113, 116-112, 115-113) to lift the belt, a decision that is not well-received by the pro-Stevens crowd in Johannesburg. With the win, Castilloux runs his career record to 30-10-3 (9). The loss drops Stevens to 31-9-1 (19).

Nov. 7, 1942: Excitement is in the air at Chicago’s Comiskey Park as one of boxing’s current stars, “Homicide Hank” Armstrong, defends his WBA WW title, plus, as an added attraction, the “Man of Steel,” Tony Zale, returns to the ring in his first bout since losing the WBA MW crown to Holman Williams; he faces top 10 contender Freddie “the Boxing Bell Hop” Apostoli in a 10-round, non-title bout. In the early rounds, Zale assumes the role of aggressor and, after a slow start, conceding a couple of early rounds, Zale seems to be in charge by the midway point (with the unofficial scorer at ringside having him up by a count of 48-47). In round six, Apostoli takes a tumble to the canvas, but it is ruled a slip (caused by a push), and not a knockdown. For most of the round and round seven, Zale struggles with his timing, but he does manage to land enough leather to cause some puffiness around the left eye of Apostoli. As the bout wears on and heads to its conclusion, Zale continues to grind and outwork his opponent, who tires noticeably in the final few rounds. In the 10th and final round, things catch up with Apostoli who goes down from a powerful Zale combination and barely manages to beat the count and last until the final bell. The end result is a solid but unspectacular points win for Zale – but wait, when the judges’ cards are read, it’s a shocking result, a UD 10 for Apostoli (by the narrowest of margins, 95-94, on all three cards). Certainly, a shocking result, as the punches landed stats showed almost a 3-to-2 edge for Zale, who scored the only knockdown and was the harder puncher. A check of the cards showed identical scores for all 10 rounds (rounds one and two, and five through eight for Apostoli, the rest for Zale, including a 10-8 in the final round. The outcome is greeted by a chorus of boos from the knowledgeable fight fans here in Chicago, who expected, with the final round KD, to see Zale’s hand raised in triumph. Anyway, the post-bout career records are 29-9-2 (22) for Apostoli, and 33-4 (20) for Zale. After the crowd has calmed down, it is time for the main event, as Henry Armstrong faces a challenge for his WBA WW title belt from ex-Champ Eddie Dolan, still a top five WW contender and a dangerous foe. Dolan, who has lost to Armstrong twice before (most recently, in 1939, he was a TKO victim in losing the WBA title to “Homicide Hank”). This marks Armstrong’s return to the WW division after campaigning as a MW and falling short in two title efforts (losing to the aforementioned Tony Zale and, more recently, to Holman Williams). In this bout, Armstrong goes to work in round two, dropping Dolan with a hard cross. The resilient Dolan recovers quickly and settles into a rhythm, holding off Armstrong’s aggressive thrusts while unable to generate much of an attack on his own. After the first five rounds, the unofficial scorer at ringside has Armstrong well ahead (49-46). In the middle rounds, it becomes a bit of a grind, with Armstrong hammering away at times, easing up at others, while a passive Dolan just seems to be content with standing his ground, all while not troubling the three-time WBA titleholder. Late in round nine, Armstrong rocks Dolan with an uppercut, but the challenger does not go down. At the two-thirds mark, and with Dolan already visibly showing signs of fatigue, the unofficial card has Armstrong up by four (97-93). Late in round 13, Dolan, on wobbly legs, goes down a second time from a hard shot to the midsection. More pressure from Armstrong, and as the seconds tick, the ref steps in to call a halt. TKO 13 for Armstrong, another success in his first WBA WW title defense in over a year. Post-bout career marks: Armstrong, 40-6-3 (33); Dolan, 37-10-5 (14).

Nov. 13, 1942: North of the border for the next fight card, held at Toronto’s Maple Leaf Gardens. Featured in the main event is a BW clash that could accurately be described as another one of those “crossroads” bout, with ex-WBA BW Champ Johnny King (who still holds the EBU and GBU BW belts) facing American Lou Salica, a one-time USBA BW Champ. First meeting of these two, and it’s a 10-round, non-title affair. The action is slow to develop, and it is a sluggish start from King that allows Salica to steal the first two rounds. Then, in round three, King surges forward and drops Salica with a hard shot. The American fighter takes an eight count, and recovers enough of his senses to cover up and last the round. However, King has dished out sufficient punishment to cause a welt to form under Salica’s right eye. After another good round in the fifth, the unofficial scorer at ringside has King ahead on points (49-46) at the halfway point of the bout. After a couple of pedestrian rounds, King presses the action by moving inside in round eight. With both men tiring badly, Salica, sensing he is trailing, takes an aggressive posture, hoping to mount an effective rally; instead, he runs into a King uppercut and goes down for a second time in round nine. The bout goes the distance, and King takes a UD 10 (97-93, 97-92, 96-93). The win lifts King to 55-9-2 (22). The loss drops Salica to 27-10-4 (11).

Nov. 14, 1942: Twin title bouts top the next card at Liverpool in the UK. In the first of the dual title bouts, the GBU Flyweight title, recently vacated by Benny Lynch, who recently hung up the gloves. Jackie Paterson and Tiny Bostock are matched in a battle for the vacant belt. It is a cautious start by both men, not much in the way of action through the early rounds, with Paterson holding the edge in terms of the punches landed stat. At the midway point, Paterson has a solid points advantage (59-55), according to the unofficial card. By the end of round seven, there is puffiness around the right eye of Bostock, who is fighting an uphill battle at this point. In the ninth round, Bostock is cut over the swollen right eye. Later in round 11, there is puffiness around Bostock’s other eye, the left one. In the end, the bout goes to decision and Paterson claims the GBU title by taking the UD 12 by a wide margin (119-109, 120-108, 119-109). Post-bout career marks: Paterson, 17-3-1 (13); Bostock, 25-17-4 (8). The second of the twin title bouts has veteran Ernie Roderick putting his Commonwealth WW title on the line, facing a challenge from Arthur Danaher. In their one previous encounter, for the GBU WW title, Roderick took a UD back in mid-1941. This time around, Danaher takes on the role of aggressor and, in round three, he manages to get Roderick’s attention by stunning the Champ with a strong cross; Roderick covers up and manages to last the round. Danaher continues to offer a stiff challenge and, at the midway point, he has forged a narrow points lead (58-56), according to the unofficial scorer at ringside. Into the later rounds, and Danaher, who is running low on energy, continues to press home an attack, while Roderick prefers to stay on the outside and wait for opportunities to counter. The bout goes the rest of the way without incident, with both men emerging unmarked, and Roderick is able to retain the belt via a UD 12 (116-112, 116-112, 115-113), running his career totals to 27-15-3 (7). The loss drops Danaher to 17-7 (10).

Nov. 14, 1942: The scene shifts to New Orleans’ Coliseum Arena, for a fight card topped by two long-time LH contenders, both former WBA Champions, who are now drawing near the end of their respective careers: “Slapsie Maxie” Rosenbloom and John Henry Lewis. In two prior meetings, both in 1937 and both for the WBA title, Rosenbloom emerged victorious. In the opening round, Lewis connects with a strong shot and puts Rosenbloom down for a six-count. The bout remains close through the opening rounds, and the unofficial card has the bout even (47-47) at the midway point, with a slight stamina and punches landed edge for Rosenbloom, who seems to have shaken off the effects of the early knockdown. Lewis steps up the pace and goes onto the attack in the later rounds, but Maxie is able to evade his roundhouse blows. The bout goes the distance, and while one judge, impressed with Lewis’ aggressive, gives him the nod, Rosenbloom takes a razor-thin SD 10 (93-96, 95-94, 95-94), after winning the final round on all three cards. Post-bout records: Rosenbloom, 54-16-6 (18); Lewis, 29-12-3 (19).

Last edited by JCWeb; 11-27-2019 at 04:29 PM.
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Old 12-01-2019, 04:43 PM   #1346
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Nov. 1942, Part 2 of 2

This report covers a total of 61 bouts taking place during the second half of November 1942. One WBA title bout is included in this report.

Nov. 20, 1942: Friday night fistic action at Pittsburgh. LH prospect Jimmy Bivins remains unbeaten, carving up aging veteran Oscar Rankin with a TKO 7 to run his career totals to 16-0 (14). LHs also feature in the main event, which sees a rematch of a 1940 WBA LH title matchup, as Eddie Booker faces Gus Lesnevich. Lesnevich, who has slid considerably down the LH rankings after winning a narrow SD 15 in that earlier encounter, runs into a Booker uppercut and goes down, taking a seven-count in the bout’s opening stanza. Over the next few rounds, Lesnevich recovers, steadies himself, and gradually punches his way back into the fight. In round five, he scores with a solid cross that stuns Booker, who backs away and covers up to avoid further punishment. At the midway point, Booker still leads (48-46) on the unofficial card, mainly due to the impact of the KD in the opening round. Into the later rounds, the bout remains close, with Lesnevich taking round six but then Booker scores heavily in round seven, causing Lesnevich’s right eye to puff up. Both men tire badly but continues to battle into the final few rounds. The bout remains close to the very end, with the judge’s final scores reflecting that fact, as Booker takes a SD 10 (96-93, 94-95, 97-93) to avenge the SD loss in the earlier bout. With the win, Booker is now 28-3-1 (15). The loss leaves Lesnevich at 32-9-3 (15).

Nov. 21, 1942
: To neutral Sweden for the next fight card, at Gothenburg’s Ullevi Stadium. Two EBU titleholders are featured in co-features that serve as double main events. In the first of these, EBU HW Champ Max Schmeling, still unable to arrange a WBA title rematch with Joe Louis despite his solid #1 contender status, settles for a rematch with Art Lasky, who he defeated earlier in the year. Schmeling dominates the action from the opening bell, winning big in round one, as Lasky retreats to his corner with a puffy blotch under his left eye. Midway through the second, a Schmeling hook has Lasky reeling, but the American remains on his feet and tries to cover up. However, he defenseless against the powerful German, who rips open a gash over Lasky’s right eye, and then has Lasky hopeless against the ropes when, with seconds remaining, the ref steps in to call a halt. Another impressive outing for the German fighter, and the TKO 2 win lifts Schmeling to 62-6-1 (44). For Lasky, it is the end of the line, as he wraps up a 13-year career at 30-14-3 (28). The finale showcases the skills of the “Casablanca Clouter,” Frenchman Marcel Cerdan, who defends his EBU MW title for the ninth time, facing an overmatched young British MW, Tommy Davies, who is still one bout away from Prime career stage. Cerdan dominates the early action, but Davies shows surprising resilience to remain on his feet until late in round four, when Cerdan knocks Davies down with a strong uppercut. Davies regains his footing and, near the end of round five, he surprises Cerdan by landing a straight right. However, Cerdan remains in solid control, as the unofficial card at the midway point reveals a wide points lead (60-53) for the Champion. By round seven, the punishment dished out by Cerdan begins to take its toll, as Davies begins to show signs of fatigue, plus is struggling with a rapidly swelling right eye. Midway through round eight, Davies goes down a second time, this from a Cerdan hook. Two more KDs, both from Cerdan crosses, follow in round nine. In round 10, another Cerdan cross puts Davies on the deck for the fifth time in the bout, and yet the British challenger regains his footing, ready to accept more punishment. Cerdan eases off in the final two rounds, opting for a safety-first posture, and the bout goes the distance, with Cerdan taking a lopsided UD 12 (120-102 on all three cards); indeed, it is one of the most one-sided bouts in recent memory. Post-bout records: Cerdan, 34-3-2 (24); Davies, 16-3-1 (7).

Nov. 21, 1942: Excitement is afoot at the Cow Palace in San Francisco, in particular, about the next WBA HW title bout, as Joe Louis makes a rare appearance on the West Coast to defend his title, facing challenger Lee Ramage. First meeting of the two, and Ramage has amassed a strong recent record of five wins and one draw since early 1941 to set up this title matchup. The “Brown Bomber” is on his best form tonight, breaking down Ramage’s defenses in the opening round, decking Ramage with a big shot, then swarming all over his opponent, with the ref being forced in to call a halt with less than half a minute remaining in the opening stanza. TKO 1 in another impressive outing for Louis, who runs his career totals to an impressive 41-1-1 (39). Ramage, who will be at End career stage in his next bout, is now 40-15-2 (11).

Nov. 27, 1942: South of the border for the next fight card, in Mexico City. In the feature, hometown favorite Raul Casanova, the current LABF BW Champion, gets a crack at the recently dethroned WBA BW Champ, K. O. Morgan in a 10-round, non-title affair. It’s the first meeting of these two but, unfortunately for Casanova, he is at Post-Prime career stage while Morgan is still at Prime. Strong start from Morgan, who puts Casanova on his back foot in the opening round. Casanova battles back to keep the bout reasonably close, and he does enough to keep the scores even (48-48), according to the unofficial scorer at ringside, at the halfway point of the bout. While Casanova strives to seize the initiative, Morgan continues to bang away, piling up points. The stamina factor is a huge edge for the ex-Champ, Morgan. The pro-Mexican crowd urges Casanova onward, as the battle is rejoined for the final two rounds. Both men remain unmarked as the bout heads to a decision, and the UD 10 verdict goes to Morgan (96-94, 97-93, 97-93). Solid bounceback win for Morgan after his WBA title loss. Post-bout career marks: Morgan, 37-13-8 (17); Casanova, 32-11-2 (15).

Nov. 28, 1942: Twin co-features top the next card, back in UK at the Olympia in London. In the first of these, GBU LH Freddie Mills faces another top 10 LH contender and one-time WBA LH Champion, Lloyd Marshall, in a 10-round, non-title affair. In the opening round, Mills digs a right hook to the body that gets Marshall’s attention. Mills follows with a strong round two and seizes the initiative, moving inside to do further damage in round three. In round four, Marshall becomes more aggressive, and he rips open a cut over Mills’ left eye. Then in round five, Marshall lands a huge shot that puts Mills on the deck and, to the dismay of the British fight fans, Mills cannot beat the count and is counted out. Impressive KO 5 win for Marshall, who improves to 23-4-2 (21) with the win. Mills slips to 24-5-1 (14) with the loss. The final bout of the evening is for the EBU Flyweight title, with four-time former EBU Champ Istvan Enekes seeking to regain that belt, facing the man who most recently took the title from him, Brit Peter Kane. Lots of posturing but little in the way of action until late in the fourth round, when a Kane combination sends Enekes to the canvas. The bout remains close through the midway point, and Kane, by virtue of the one KD, holds a slim points lead (57-56), according to the unofficial scorer at ringside. Enekes surges with a big round seven. The bout remains close into the later rounds with Kane, urged on by the British fight fans, becoming more aggressive as the bout wore on. By round 11, there is noticeable swelling around the right eye of the challenger as a result of Kane’s solid punching. In the final round, Kane backs off a bit while Enekes looks for a knockout. In the end, the bout goes to decision and Kane retains the EBU title by taking a close but UD 12 (114-113, 115-113, 115-112). Post-bout career marks: Kane, 25-4-1 (11); Enekes, 38-13-2 (11).

Nov. 28, 1942: The month wraps with a nice card at New York’s Madison Square Garden. First, two notable impressive outings on the undercard by two hot young unbeaten prospects, both of whom register KO wins: LH Ezzard Charles, who improves to 11-0 (10), and FW Willie Pep, who improves to 15-0 (12) and is looking at a possible top 20 ranking in the near future. The feature is for the vacant USBA BW title, with #1 ranked BW and ex-WBA Champ Georgie Pace matched with Benny Goldberg for the vacant belt. It is the first meeting of the two, and the first title shot of any kind for Goldberg, who is unbeaten with four wins a draw in his last five outings. Two-thirds of the way through the opening round, the underdog Goldberg announces his presence when he tags Pace with a nice uppercut that forces the ex-Champ to cover up to last the round. Goldberg follows up with another strong round in the second, and there is puffiness around Pace’s left eye as a result. Goldberg continues to perform well through the opening rounds, and he is well ahead on the unofficial card (49-46) at the midway point. Into the later rounds, Pace (pardon the pun) decides to pick up the pace and gradually becomes more and more aggressive. Goldberg is content to work on the outside, nursing his points lead as the rounds tick off. In round 10, an overly aggressive Pace falls victim to another Goldberg uppercut, sending him to the canvas to take a count of four before arising. Pace, left eye nearly closed, continues to press the attack into the final few rounds, but Goldberg’s defense remains solid. The bout goes the distance, and the UD 12 goes to Goldberg by a wide margin (118-109, 118-109, 119-108). Post-bout records: Goldberg, 21-2-2 (10); Pace, 29-12-2 (19). It turns out this will be Pace’s last bout at Prime, as he hits Pre-Prime with his next bout, in 1943.

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Old 12-12-2019, 04:12 PM   #1347
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Dec. 1942, Part 1 of 2

This report covers a total of 60 bouts taking place during the first half of December 1942. No WBA title bouts are included in this report.

Dec. 4, 1942: The month commences with a Friday card at the “Aud,” in Buffalo, New York. Main even sees a battle for the USBA LW title, with Sammy “Clutch” Angott facing the man he defeated earlier in the year, Willie Joyce, in winning the title via a split decision, in a rematch given the closeness of their previous encounter. After a close opening round, Angott lands some solid punches to take round two. In round three, he opens up a nasty cut on the bridge of Joyce’s nose. In addition, the challenger’s left eye begins to puff up. Midway through the fifth round, the cut on Joyce’s nose resumes bleeding until it becomes so severe that the ref steps in to call a halt to the action. Despite severe protests from Joyce’s corner, Angott is declared a TKO 5 victor due to the cut stoppage. For Angott, it is his fifth win in succession, boosting his career totals to 26-5-5 (10). The loss leaves Joyce at 22-4-3 (12).

Dec. 5, 1942: To Havana’s Gran Stadium for the next fistic action. Topping the agenda are a pair of 10-round, non-title bouts matching a popular local Cuban fighter with a ranked contender. In the first of these, aging veteran FW Frankie Covelli faces hometown favorite, National Kid. Covelli is nearing the end of his career, while Kid has just hit Prime career stage earlier this year, and it’s the first meeting of these two. There is a shock knockdown in the opening round as Covelli drops Kid with a hard shot; Kid recovers quickly, scrambling to his feet and then covering up to last the round. Kid rallies in the subsequent rounds and builds a points edge (48-46) at the midway point, according to the unofficial scorer at ringside. Into the second half of the bout, and Covelli presses forward, becoming more and more aggressive. This gives Kid the opportunity to launch some good countershots, and he manages to cause some swelling around the left eye of the American. On the other hand, Covelli also connects in round nine, and there is puffiness under the right eye of Kid as a result. The bout remains close until the final round, with Kid taking round 10 on all three cards to take a close but UD 10 (96-94, 96-94, 95-94) to push his career record to an impressive 21-2-1 (10). For Covelli, another loss leaves him at 35-17-9 (7). In the second co-feature, two ranked MW contenders do battle, with ex-WBA Champ Ken Overlin taking on Kid Tunero, former LABF MW Champ who is on the comeback trail after having won his last three in a row. First meeting of the two, and it’s another American versus Cuban matchup. The bout remains extremely close through the opening few rounds, with neither man yielding much ground. After five full rounds of action, the unofficial scorer at ringside has the bout scored as even (48-48). Into the second half of the bout, the experience and stamina factors seem to work in favor of Overlin. Beginning in round seven, Tunero steps in the pace, moving inside and applying more pressure, compared to the more safety-first, counterpunching style of Overlin. In round eight, Tunero sustains a cut under his left eye. Undeterred, the Cuban fighter continues to press home the attack, but, by now, Overlin has built a comfortable points lead. The bout goes the full 10 without any cuts or knockdowns, and, despite some doubts from one judge who may have been unduly influenced by the pro-Tunero crowd, Overlin emerges victorious, taking a MD 10 (98-92, 96-96, 98-93). Post-bout records: Overlin, 40-10-5 (14); Tunero, 36-16-5 (10).

Dec. 5, 1942: Next is an admittedly light card, held at St. Louis’ Kiel Auditorium. No titles being contested, but two top 10 HWs take to the ring in the main event, as Nathan Mann faces the hard-hitting and always exciting Elmer “Kid Violent” Ray. First meeting of the two, and Mann, knowing Ray’s reputation as a devastating puncher, selects a cautious approach to matters through the opening few rounds. In round three, however, Ray works his way inside and does enough damage to cause Mann’s left eye to puff up. In round five, the action picks up as Ray, who is cut over his left eye, ignores the cut and then decks Mann with a big shot. Mann scrambles to his feet at the count of three and manages to last the round by covering up. At the midway point, the unofficial scorer, despite a 10-8 round for Mann, has the bout even (47-47). In round six, it is Mann’s turn to unleash a telling blow, flooring Ray with a wicked cross to the head. After taking a six count, Ray arises and recovers, covering up to last the round. Into the later rounds and Ray, shrugging off the effects of both the cut and the knockdown, remains the aggressor. However, early in round eight, he sustains a cut over his other (right) eye, and this leads to a cuts stoppage – and a TKO 8 for Mann, who improves his career totals to 26-8-3 (21). For Ray, now 47-16-1 (32), this may serve to end his days as a top flight contender, as he will at End career stage in his next bout.

Dec. 11, 1942: Next is a Friday night card at the Forum in Montreal. Featured in the main event is a bout for the Commonwealth MW title, with Canadian Lou Brouillard defending that belt for the fourth time against Ron Richards, who has held the title on three previous occasions, losing it to Brouillard back in 1937. Previously, back in 1934, Richards took the title from Brouillard. So, with the career matchups at one win apiece, this bout is the rubber match between these two veteran MW contenders, both of whom are on the downside of their respective careers. Tough start for Richards, who is cut over his right eye early in round two. With the hometown crowd squarely behind him, Brouillard surges to a two-point lead on the unofficial card (59-57) at the halfway point of the bout. In round seven, the cut over Richards’ eye is reopened, but then, suddenly, a cut appears above Brouillard’s left eye. Going into the later rounds, good cornerwork from both sides sees the cuts brought under control, and the challenger, Richards, ventures forward with a more aggressive approach as both men begin to tire. Eventually, though, the cut over Richards’ eye is reopened and second, and then a third, time, leading to a late stoppage. The bout goes into the books as a TKO 11 for Brouillard, who keeps the belt. Post-bout career marks: Brouillard, 37-16-3 (17); Richards, 37-20-2 (24). This bout may represent the last hurrah for both fighters, as both will be at End career stage in 1943.

Dec. 12, 1942: To Johannesburg, South Africa for the next card, at the Rand Stadium. Still unable to arrange a WBA title bout, #1 HW contender and current EBU HW Champion Max Schmeling faces Lou Nova in a 10-round, non-title affair. First meeting of the two; Schmeling has won 16 straight since his title loss to Joe Louis back in 1939. After a solid opening round, Schmeling leaves himself open to a Nova cross and takes a tumble to the canvas in round two, barely beating the count but then wisely covering up to last the round. In round three, Nova works inside but is unable to follow up and, instead, finds himself on the receiving end of some hard shots from the German that cause his left eye to puff up. Late in round five, Schmeling connects with a hard cross to the head that puts Nova on the deck, so it’s one KD apiece. A peek at the unofficial card after five has Schmeling in front (by a count of 48-45). Schmeling, who still has a ways to go before hitting Post-Prime career stage, continues to grind away, piling up points and keeping Nova off balance. The bout goes to decision without any more drama, and Schmeling takes a fairly comfortable UD 10 (97-91, 96-92, 95-93), improving his career totals to 63-6-1 (44) with the win. Nova slips to 26-11 (21) with the loss.

Dec. 12, 1942: The scene shifts to Miami for the next fistic action. Topping the card is a bout for the NABF MW title, with Charley Burley, still hoping for a WBA title shot, making his fifth defense of theat title. His opponent, whom he has not faced before, is LABF MW titleholder, Jose Basora of Cuba. Each fighter has only tasted defeat once before, prior to this title matchup. Solid start from Burley, who manages to pile up an early points lead, mixing up an inside and outside attack against the aggressive Cuban challenger. The unofficial scorer at ringside has Burley up by two (58-56) at the midway point, with Basora rallying after a pedestrian start to take rounds five and six. Into the later rounds, Burley seems to content to stay mostly on the outside, adopting a safety first policy, gradually wearing down his less experienced opponent. The bout goes the distance, and the UD 12 goes to Burley by a comfortable margin (116-112, 117-111, 118-110). Post-bout records: Burley, 31-1 (22); Basora, 19-2 (15).
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Old 12-22-2019, 05:12 PM   #1348
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Dec. 1942, Part 2 of 2

This report covers a total of 63 bouts taking place during the second half of December 1942. One WBA title bout is included in this report.

Dec. 18, 1942: It’s a relatively small gathering for a light Friday night card at San Juan, Puerto Rico. Featured in the main event is a LW clash with Tony Chavez, a former USBA and LABF LW titleholder, seeking revenge versus “His Satanic Majesty,” Lefty “Satan” Flynn, who took a controversial DQ win versus Chavez some eight years previous to this. Not much in the way of action for the opening few rounds, with but Chavez seems to have the edge after a big round in the third. In round five, a Chavez combination drops Flynn to the canvas. Although Flynn is able to continue, the damage was done and Chavez has the lead (but only by one, 48-47), on the unofficial card as mysteriously, the unofficial scorer had it as a 10-9, not the standard 10-8 round, for Chavez in the fifth. Flynn takes a second tumble to the deck in round seven, but he continues with an aggressive approach after recovering and covering up to last the round. Chavez coasts in the final two rounds, not wanting a repeat of what happened in their prior encounter, back in 1934. The bout goes to decision and, with the two KDs, it goes down as a comfortable UD 10 for Chavez (98-91, 97-91, 98-90), who boosts his career totals to 35-11-4 (12). The loss leaves Flynn at 27-11-2 (13).

Dec. 19, 1942: To Detroit’s Briggs Stadium for the next fistic action. A couple of exciting bouts headline the card and, in the first of these, unbeaten young WW prospect “Sugar” Ray Robinson faces a grizzled veteran of the ring wars, Andy Callahan. As Callahan, at 32, is nearing the end of a long 15-year career, many are predicting an easy win for young Robinson, despite the fact he is stepping up in class against a much more experienced opponent in Callahan, who has been a fringe contender in the WW ranks for years and briefly held the NABF WW title, back in 1937. Just a minute into the bout, a lightning quick hook to the head by Robinson stuns Callahan, who immediately covers up and nearly last the round until the final 30 seconds, when “Sugar Ray” lands a vicious hook that puts the veteran WW down and out. An impressive KO 1 for Robinson to push his career record to an unblemished 16-0 (13). Callahan ends the bout at 35-19-7 (12). Welterweights are again featured in the second main event, with Fritzie Zivic putting his NABF WW title on the line, facing challenger another veteran WW contender, Barney Ross. For Zivic, who has been fairly active since winning this belt in mid-1941, this is his fifth title defense, and he faces Ross, a former WBA and NABF WW titleholder, for the first time. Action is slow to develop, but Zivic seems to have the better of it through much of the early going. By the midway point, the defending Champion is well ahead (59-55) on the unofficial card. Beginning in round seven, Ross steps in the pace, becoming more and more aggressive. By round nine, there is noticeable swelling around Ross’ left as the accumulated impact of Zivic’s blows has taken its toll. No cuts or knockdowns, and the bout goes the rest of the way without incident, with Zivic coming away a rather convincing UD 12 winner (118-111, 117-112, 117-111). Post-bout records: Zivic, 32-10-6 (15); Ross, 37-15-4 (11).

Dec. 19, 1942: To the West Coast for a huge card, at the Olympic Auditorium in Los Angeles. A WBA FW title bout tops the agenda card, held at St. Louis’ Kiel Auditorium. Main supporting bout matches two top 10 LHs, with Tiger Jack Fox, recently dethroned as NABF LH Champion, taking on Harry Matthews in a non-title affair. First meeting of the two, so there is a long feeling-out process through the opening few rounds. By round five, Fox appears to have the upper hand, and he dominates the action on the inside, stunning Matthews with a powerful hook, and continuing a one-sided assault until the ref is forced to step in and call a halt. An impressive TKO 5 win for Fox, running his record to 54-8-1 (39). For Matthews, it is just his second career loss (and first via a stoppage), leaving him at 21-2 (16), stunting his rise up the LH ranks. Then, in the main event, battle for supremacy in the topsy-turvy FW division continues as Everett Rightmire, the eighth fighter to hold the WBA FW title belt since Henry Armstrong moved up in weight some five years ago, faces challenger Petey Sarron, a guy who has twice before This time around, Sarron is hopeful of breaking through, particularly since he holds a prior UD win over Rightmire, back in San Francisco in 1941. Action is lacking in the first few rounds, with a slight punches landed edge for the Champ. After five, the unofficial card has a slim one-point edge for Rightmire (48-47). Into the middle rounds, and Rightmire’s superior conditioning begins to tell, as he gradually begins to wear down the challenger. Sarron tries to press forward, but he can make little progress against some solid defense from Rightmire. By the end of round nine, Sarron’s left eye is beginning to puff up quite a bit. Then, late in round 10, Sarron gets in his best punch of the fight, a solid cross, but Rightmire is able to cover up and last the remaining seconds left in the round. At the two-thirds mark, the unofficial scorecard has Rightmire well ahead (97-93). Punches landed stats also show a huge edge for the Champ, and Sarron is now exhibiting signs of fatigue. In round 14, more problems for Sarron’s corner as their fighter sustains a cut over his right eye. The bout goes the rest of the way without and incident and, while Rightmire retains his title, the surprise is that one judge actually had it for Sarron, the SD 15 (143-144, 144-141, 145-140) coming as a bit of a surprise, as this observer as well as the unofficial ringside scorer had Rightmire the winner by a wide margin. Post-bout career marks: Rightmire, 34-12-3 (14); Sarron, 40-23-6 (11). Game effort from Sarron, however, as he came into the bout at End career stage versus a in-prime Champion in Rightmire.

Dec. 26, 1942: Next up is the traditional “Boxing Day” card, this time at the Earls Court in London. No titles on the line, and the feature matches two long-time Flyweight contenders, as ex-WBA Champ Midget Wolgast travels to London and a hostile crowd to face Jackie Brown, a British fan favorite. The two have met twice before, including once for the WBA title, with Wolgast prevailing both times. Will this third encounter be any different? From the outset Wolgast has the upper hand, exhibiting good defensive skills and some solid counterpunching that keeps Brown off guard. Not much changes as the bout heads into the middle rounds, with Wolgast securing a two-point lead on the unofficial card (49-47) at the halfway point of the bout. Heading into the later rounds, Wolgast is content to stay on the outside, allowing Brown to take the initiative and press the action on the inside. However, the British fighter begins to tire badly, and Wolgast’s smothering defense blunts all his attempts to mount a comeback. The bout, kind of a boring one, goes into the final seconds with Wolgast firmly in command until, suddenly, Brown lands a solid punch – a hook – that puts Wolgast on the deck, but the bell sounds before the count can reach ten. The bout, therefore, goes to the judges and, despite a 10-8 final round for Brown, Wolgast scoops up the UD 10 (96-93, 97-92, 97-92). Post-bout career marks: Wolgast, 57-9-1 (19); Brown, 40-19-5 (12). A close call for Wolgast, who may have been counted out had three more seconds been left on the clock at the time of the final round knockdown.

Dec. 26, 1942: The penultimate fight card of the year takes place at Manila’s Rizal Arena. Again, no title bouts are featured, and the main event matches the popular Filipino Flyweight, Little Dado, reigning OPBF Champion, who takes on Rinty Monaghan in a rematch of their 1941 encounter that ended in a controversial MD 10 for Monaghan. Both fighters start slowly, and caution prevails through the opening few rounds. Dado gets going with a strong round in the fourth, and a peek at the unofficial card after five has the Filipino in front (by a count of 49-46), but there is a touch of swelling around Dado’s right eye. Into the later rounds, and Monaghan presses the action on the inside, targeting the cut, while Dado is content to work outside. The bout goes the rest of the way without incident and Dado, avoiding the situation in their prior outing, maintains his lead to take a UD 10 (96-94 on all cards), running his career totals to 28-4-1 (13) with the win, but it will be his last bout at Prime, as the effects of aging will begin to take effect in 1943. Monaghan, who still has plenty of Prime years left, 30-8-1 (11) with the loss.

Dec. 31, 1942: The month and year wrap up with a fine New Year’s Eve card at New York’s Madison Square Garden. It’s a packed card for the final event of the year, featuring some unbeaten young prospects, such as Jake “the Bronx Bull” LaMotta, who keeps his slate clean, now 9-0 (9), after a three-round TKO demolition of his TC opponent. Two unbeaten WW prospects do battle, with Billy Graham eking out a SD 8 (77-75, 75-77, 77-75) over O’Neill Bell, running his record to 8-0 (6), while Bell’s first career setback leaves him at 7-1 (3). Later in the card sees Beau Jack, an exciting LW prospect, take to the ring, as he takes on veteran journeyman Tommy Spiegel. Jack does not disappoint, dominating the action and flooring Spiegel in the fifth round, en route to an impressive UD 10 win (97-92, 100-89, 99-91) to run his record to 17-1 (14). Spiegel, who ended the bout with both eyes cut and swollen, is now 27-13-4 (6) and will be at End career stage starting with his next bout. Later in the evening, another unbeaten prospect, LH Ezzard Charles, the “Cincinnati Cobra,” takes to the ring to face another LH prospect, Fitzie Fitzpatrick. Charles wastes little time, dropping Fitzpatrick with a huge uppercut near the end of the opening stanza; Fitzpatrick cannot beat the count but is saved by the bell, so the bout continues. The bout doesn’t last much longer, as, after two hard shots and a rapidly swelling right eye, Fitzpatrick is finished, and the ref calls a halt. TKO 2 for Charles, running his record to a perfect 12-0 (11); for Fitzpatrick, it is his second loss, leaving him at 10-2-1 (10) heading into 1943. Then, in the first of two co-main events, two BWs on the comeback trail are matched for the first time: Manuel Ortiz, who recently lost the WBA BW title and Tom Smith, who was recently dethroned as GBU BW Champ. Ortiz goes to work quickly, dropping Smith to the deck with a huge cross in the opening round. Smith covers up and manages to last the round. Smith offers little in the following rounds, enabling Ortiz to compile a hefty points lead (50-44 on the unofficial card) by the halfway point. The end comes in round seven, when Smith (trailing badly and bothered by a puffy left eye) walks into an Ortiz combination that puts him down and out. KO 7 for Ortiz, helping re-establish his credentials as a top BW contender. Post-bout career records: Ortiz, 21-4-1 (14); Smith, 21-12-6 (11). Then, in the second co-feature, the USBA WW title is on the line, as Izzy Jannazzo makes his sixth defense of the belt against Wilson, a former NABF WW titleholder, who impressed in his last outing with a first round TKO over Jimmy Garrison. Jannazzo enters the bout coming off a loss to Fritzie Zivic for the NABF title in his last bout. It is the first meeting of the two, and so the action is slow to develop in the opening few rounds. Wilson tries to bang away inside but is largely unsuccessful, due to some good defense from Jannazzo. At the halfway point, the unofficial scorer has it even (57-57), despite a nice punches landed edge for Jannazzo. In the second half of the bout, Jannazzo continues to grind away, keeping Wilson off guard while landing enough blows to score points and win rounds. Jannazzo’s superior stamina also begins to tell, and Wilson is reduced to launching desperate attacks in the final few rounds. The bout goes the distance and, in the end, Wilson did enough to convince one judge, but Jannazzo wins the other two to take a SD 12 (115-113, 113-115, 117-111) and improve his career mark to 35-6-4 (13). The loss drops Wilson to 25-6-2 (16).
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1942 - Heavyweights

And now for the year-end status reports, starting with the HW Division.

HW

Division Profile

Total: 173 RL: 94 TC: 79

RL by Career Stage:
End - 13
Post - 17
Prime - 37
Pre - 20
Beginning - 7 (4 New)

Rated: 70
800+: 19
500+: 41
200+ : 63

Jan 1943 Rankings (Perf Points and Changes from Jan. 1942 in Parens):

WBA Champ: Joe Louis 41-1-1 (39) (2060) (NC)
1. Max Schmeling 63-6-1 (44) (1924) (NC) (EBU)
2. Jersey Joe Walcott 43-7 (27) (1559) (NC) (NABF)
3. Abe Simon 30-6-1 (21) (1253) (+3)
4. Roscoe Toles 36-10-3 (6) (1252) (-1)
5. Tommy Farr 23-3-1 (16) (1236) (NC) (GBU)
6. Nathan Mann 26-8-3 (21) (1143) (+3)
7. Walter Neusel 30-13-3 (21) (1053) (+1)
8. Max Baer 35-17 (30) (1039) (+3)
9. Lee Ramage 40-15-2 (11) (1031) (+5)
10. Tommy Martin 29-12-3 (17) (1014) (-5) (CBU)

Other Notables: 11. Elmer Ray 47-16-1 (32) (1013)
12. Lem Franklin 22-4 (17) (867)
13. Lee Q. Murray 22-3 (19) (867)
14. Jack Trammell 32-13 (15) (866) (USBA)
16. Pat Comiskey 20-1 (13) (842)
22. Alberto Santiago Lovell 29-12-1 (23) (710) (LABF)

Top Prospects: Olle Tandberg 13-0-1 (4)
Lou Brooks 11-0 (11)
Nino Valdes 8-0 (8)
Bruce Woodcock 5-0 (5)
Herb Narvo 5-0 (4)

Retirements:

Don McCorkindale (SAF) 1928-1942 32-20-1 (18) CBU Title Highest Rank: 3
Jack Roper (USA) 1924-1942 36-26-2 (16) No Titles Highest Rank: 63
Hans Schonrath (GER) 1928-1942 35-19-4 (17) No Titles Highest Rank: 37
Al Ettore (USA) 1930-1942 26-18-3 (17) No Titles Highest Rank: 45
Charley Retzlaff (USA) 1928-1942 36-23 (27) No Titles Highest Rank: 10
Hans Birkie (GER) 1929-1942 34-22-3 (4) No Titles Highest Rank: 69
Roy Lazer (USA) 1931-1942 22-19-3 (10) No Titles Highest Rank: 49
Joe Banovic (USA) 1926-1942 41-22-3 (11) NABF, USBA Title Highest Rank: 5
Art Lasky (USA) 1930-1942 30-14-3 (28) USBA Title Highest Rank: 5
Ludwig Haymann (GER) 1925-1942 38-26-5 (22) No Titles Highest Rank: 26

Outlook for 1943: Louis remains in the midst of a long run as WBA Champion, and while Schemling and Walcott are established as credible #1 and #2 contenders, barring a shocking upset, Louis is likely to keep the title until age catches up with him. The rest of the division looks like a lot of musical chairs, with positions shifting constantly. Abe Simon emerged to win four of his last five but barely edged Roscoe Toles in a rather pedestrian performance in his most recent outing. Franklin and Murray have the potential to move into the top 10 ranks, given that aging vets such as Baer, Ramage and Martin have begun to slip. Cuban Nino Valdes is the best of the young prospects, but none of the four newcomers due to debut in 1943 are rated higher than a “4.”

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Old 12-25-2019, 02:44 PM   #1350
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1942 - Light Heavyweights

LH

Division Profile

Total: 105 RL: 58 TC: 47

RL by Career Stage:
End - 7
Post - 6
Prime - 27
Pre - 12
Beginning - 6 (2 New)

Rated: 44
800+: 17
500+: 30
200+ : 39

Jan 1943 Rankings (Perf Points and Changes from Jan. 1942 in Parens):

WBA Champ: Billy Conn 29-5-3 (12) (1367) (+1)
1. Archie Moore 24-2-4 (18) (1398) (-1) (NABF)
2. Tiger Jack Fox 54-8-1 (39) (1361) (+2)
3. Eddie Booker 38-3-1 (15) (1335) (+3)
4. Maxie Rosenbloom 54-16-6 (18) (1323) (-1)
5. Tony Shucco 37-16-2 (13) (1176) (-3)
6. Lloyd Marshall 23-4-2 (21) (1120) (+5)
7. Freddie Mills 24-5-1 (14) (1119) (+6) (GBU)
8. Melio Bettina 28-5-5 (11) (1096) (NC) (USBA)
9. Adolf Heuser 41-12-2 (19) (1009) (-2) (EBU)
10. Harry Matthews 21-2 (16) (970) (+6)

Other Notables: 11. Gus Lesnevich 32-9-3 (15) (923)
15. Anton Christoforidis 26-9-1 (13) (816)
21. Jimmy Bivins 16-0 (14) (669)
22. Jack A. Johnson 19-3 (15) (666) (CBU)

Top Prospects
: Oakland Billy Smith 12-0-2 (11)
Ezzard Charles 12-0 (11)
Tommy Yarosz 11-1-1 (8)
Costello Cruz 10-0 (6)
Charley Babcock 9-0 (9)
Joey Maxim 9-0 (5)
Dolph Quijano 8-0 (8)

Retirements:

Rinaldo Palmucci (ITA) 1924-1942 40-33-3 (28) No Titles Highest Rank: 23
Bob Olin (USA) 1928-1942 34-23-3 (11) NABF Champion Highest Rank: 4
Ray Actis (USA) 1931-1942 28-16 (24) No Titles Highest Rank: 13
Dave Clark (USA) 1935-1942 18-14-1 (11) No Titles Highest Rank: 34
Marty Simmons (USA) 1930-1942 29-18-2 (15) No Titles Highest Rank: 22

Outlook for 1943: For the moment, Conn holds the WBA title, but Moore (whom he bested for the belt in a close and controversial split decision) has a higher performance point rating and many observers expect him to regain the title at some point. Surprising to see Gus Lesnevich drop out of the top ten; expect to see him and Jimmy Bivins move up the ranks in 1943. The future of the division looks bright with talented prospects such as Ezzard Charles, Tommy Yarosz and Joey Maxim, but Charles is already contemplating a move up to HW. Billy Fox is the top newcomer to be added to the mix in 1943.

Last edited by JCWeb; 12-25-2019 at 04:04 PM.
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Old 12-25-2019, 04:04 PM   #1351
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1942 - Middleweights

MW

Division Profile

Total: 139 RL: 79 TC: 60

RL by Career Stage:
End - 6
Post - 13
Prime - 35
Pre - 15
Beginning - 10 (4 New)

Rated: 57
800+: 19
500+: 42
200+ : 55

Jan 1943 Rankings (Perf Points and Changes from Jan. 1942 in Parens):

WBA Champ: Holman Williams 40-8 (21) (1791) (+5)
1. Charley Burley 31-1 (22) (1634) (+3) (NABF)
2. Marcel Cerdan 34-3-2 (24) (1516) (+1) (EBU)
3. Freddie Apostoli 29-9-2 (22) (1429) (+7)
4. Tony Zale 33-4 (20) (1428) (-4)
5. Al Hostak 35-8 (27) (1270) (+2)
6. Teddy Yarosz 39-17-4 (13) (1200) (-4)
7. Lou Brouillard 37-16-3 (17) (1182) (+2) (CBU)
8. Ken Overlin 40-10-5 (14) (1147) (NC)
9. Freddie Steele 52-10-1 (36) (1080) (-3)
10. Kid Tunero 36-16-5 (10) (1037) (+9)

Other Notables: 11. Jose Basora 19-2 (15) (1037) (LABF)
12. Jock McAvoy 37-18-6 (25) (992) (GBU)
25. Allen Matthews 34-14-4 (24) (751) (USBA)
30. Ron Richards 37-20-2 (24) (638) (OPBF)

Top Prospects: Mario Raul Ochoa 13-0 (11)
Jimmy Edgar 12-1 (9)
Dave Sands 10-0 (10)
Jake LaMotta 9-0 (9)
Joe Carter 7-0 (4)

Retirements:

Barney Keiswetter (SAF) 1929-1942 24-22-4 (8) No Titles Highest Rank: 47
Gorilla Jones (USA) 1924-1942 44-30-2 (24) USBA Champion Highest Rank: 9
Young Stuhley (USA) 1929-1942 22-16-5 (13) No Titles Highest Rank: 22
Ceferino Garcia (PHI) 1923-1942 43-26-2 (24) OPBF Champion Highest Rank: 3
Oddone Piazza (ITA) 1930-1942 29-29-4 (16) No Titles Highest Rank: 40
Al Trulmans (USA) 1929-1942 30-23-5 (15) No Titles Highest Rank: 48
Eddie Risko (USA) 1929-1942 32-16-4 (12) WBA Champ 1936 Highest Rank: 4

Outlook for 1943: Williams is back as WBA MW Champion, having bested Tony Zale for the title, just as Zale had appeared to be settled in for a long title reign. Winner of his last 11 and unbeaten for the last three years, Charley Burley appears to be the uncrowned Champion, as he still awaits his first crack at a WBA title belt. EBU Champ Cerdan, whose only loss in the past three years has been a close decision to WW Champ Henry Armstrong, remains a viable contender. After losing the title, Zale slipped even further after a surprisingly poor showing against Apostoli, who is now ahead of him in the rankings. Talented Puerto Rican fighter Jose Basora ran up 19 straight wins before struggling against tougher opposition, notably Lou Brouillard (now at End career stage) and Burley in his two most recent outings. Jock McAvoy, after over a decade as GBU MW titleholder, is still hanging around; Dick Turpin, who is way down the rankings list as #37, could be a worthy successor. Almost forgot about Allen Matthews having won the USBA title; he was due for a title defense but it didn’t happen and so he slipped in the rankings after losing a non-title bout versus Ernie Vigh. Jake LaMotta and Aussie Dave Sands are the best of the current crop of prospects looking to make a mark in coming years. Top newcomers for 1943 are Billy Arnold and Tony Janiro.
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Old 12-26-2019, 01:57 PM   #1352
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1942 - Welterweights

WW

Division Profile

Total: 135 RL: 92 TC: 43

RL by Career Stage:
End - 8
Post - 14
Prime - 34
Pre - 22
Beginning - 14 (9 New)

Rated: 62
800+: 21
500+: 39
200+ : 58

Jan 1943 Rankings (Perf Points and Changes from Jan. 1942 in Parens):

WBA Champ: Henry Armstrong 40-6-3 (33) (1803) (NC)
1. Fritzie Zivic 32-10-6 (15) (1553) (+2) (NABF)
2. Izzy Jannazzo 35-6-4 (13) (1538) (NC) (USBA)
3. Cocoa Kid 43-8-4 (13) (1417) (-2)
4. Eddie Dolan 37-10-5 (20) (1369) (NC)
5. Freddie Cochrane 30-8-4 (8) (1237) (+11)
6. Tony Canzoneri 54-8-4 (17) (1236) (new)
7. Gustav Eder 40-11-10 (9) (1170) (+1)
8. Jack McNamee 31-9-1 (18) (1140) (+3) (OPBF)
9. Saviero Turiello 35-17-10 (15) (1127) (+17) (EBU)
10. Bep Van Klaveren 37-15-9 (12) (1121) (-3)

Other Notables: 11. Jackie Wilson 25-6-2 (16) (1108)
13. Marty Servo 23-2 (9) (1058)
14. Barney Ross 37-15-4 (11) (1041)
15. Ernie Roderick 27-15-3 (7) (954) (CBU, GBU)
16. Norman Rubio 19-0 (12) (910)
21. Ray Robinson 16-0 (13) (778)

Top Prospects: Egisto Peyre 13-0 (8)
George Costner 12-1 (8)
Billy Graham 8-0 (5)
Tommy Bell 4-0 (4)
Ray Brown 3-0 (3)

Retirements
:

Chuck Woods (USA) 1930-1942 29-13-6 (12) No Titles Highest Rank: 16
Frankie Blair (USA) 1933-1942 21-14-2 (7) No Titles Highest Rank: 23
Ruby Goldstein (USA) 1924-1942 46-17-5 (30) WBA Champion 1936-37
Battling Shaw (MEX) 1927-1942 33-21-6 (14) No Titles Highest Rank: 32 (JW: 1)
Young Corbett III (USA) 1919-1942 59-22-6 (14) WBA Champion 1927-28, 1930-31

Outlook for 1943: For the time being, Armstrong appears content abandon his quest for the MW title (after two straight title losses to Zale and Williams) and continue to defend the WBA WW title he has held since 1939. Zivic and Jannazzo, holders of the NABF and USBA titles, respectively, have established themselves as the top contenders, but neither appears to have the talent to unseat “Homicide Hank.” Tony Canzoneri has moved to WW but he, like an aging Barney Ross, has had his skills so diminished that his days as a serious title threat are done. Turiello made a huge jump up the ratings after winning the EBU title from Van Klaveren. Two top unbeaten fighters being brought along carefully – Norman Rubio and “Sugar” Ray Robinson – are perhaps a year or two away from being a threat to other top contenders; of the two, Robinson is by far the most talented. Billy Graham is best of the prospects. In 1943, the ranks of the division will swell with the addition of nine new fighters, with Kid Gavilan and Bernard Docusen leading the new crop.

Last edited by JCWeb; 12-27-2019 at 12:37 PM.
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Old 12-27-2019, 12:55 PM   #1353
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1942 - Lightweights

LW

Division Profile

Total: 141 RL: 87 TC: 54

RL by Career Stage:
End - 7
Post - 17
Prime - 32
Pre - 18
Beginning - 13 (6 New)

Rated: 60
800+: 19
500+: 39
200+ : 59

Jan 1943 Rankings (Perf Points and Changes from Jan. 1942 in Parens):

WBA Champ: Jack Kid Berg 49-18-5 (16) (1455) (+5)
1. Baby Arizmendi 46-9-4 (10) (1489) (new) (NABF, LABF)
2. Aldo Spoldi 43-10-5 (17) (1327) (+2) (EBU)
3. Tony Chavez 35-11-4 (12) (1193) (-2)
4. Chino Alvarez 40-15-5 (22) (1164) (-2)
5. Sammy Angott 26-5-5 (10) (1157) (+11) (USBA)
6. Dave Castilloux 30-10-3 (9) (1153) (+4) (CBU)
7. Laurie Stevens 31-9-1 (19) (1152) (-1)
8. Lew Jenkins 26-3-3 (12) (1106) (+1)
9. Lou Ambers 37-7-2 (18) (1100) (-6)
10. Pedro Montanez 35-14 (17) (1079) (+1)

Other Notables
: 11. Willie Joyce 22-4-3 (12) (1034)
13. Bob Montgomery 20-1-2 (14) (987)
14. Lenny Mancini 20-6-3 (6) (944)
21. Ike Williams 17-0 (16) (747)
23. Beau Jack 17-1 (14) (707)
24. Harry Hurst 17-2 (9) (706)
35. Harry Mizler 24-15-6 (6) (548) (GBU)

Top Prospects: Danny Webb 13-0 (9)
Roberto Proietti 12-0 (7)
Humberto Sierra 9-0 (5)
Joe Brown 7-0 (7)
George LaRover 7-0 (6)
Enrique Bolanos 6-0 (6)
Jimmy Warren 6-0 (3)

Retirements:

Frankie Klick (USA) 1924-1942 37-27-7 (13) NABF Champ Highest Rank: 2 (JLW WBA Champ 1930)
Emory Cabana (CUB) 1923-1942 45-28-8 (13) NABF, LABF Champ Highest Rank: 1
Sammy Dorfman (USA) 1925-1942 36-27-10 (6) No Titles Highest Rank: 21
Tony Falco (USA) 1929-1942 30-24-6 (8) No Titles Highest Rank: 44
Jack Portney (USA) 1927-1942 36-21-8 (16) NABF, USBA Champ Highest Rank: 1

Outlook for 1943: 1942 will be remembered as the year when Tony Canzoneri’s decade-long dominance of this division came to an end, with Berg winning the title via a TKO and Canzoneri electing to move up to WW for the final few bouts of his career. Baby Arizmendi, the WBA FW Champ, moved up and had immediate success, claiming the NABF and LABF belts and also immediate #1 contender status, with a Perf Point total higher than Berg. Arizmendi is unbeaten in his last nine, his last setback coming in 1939 in the form of a DQ loss to Chalky Wright. Aldo Spoldi, who twice defeated Berg to win the EBU title, is thus far unable to arrange a rematch for the WBA belt due to the political situation in Europe. Other new titleholders are Sammy Angott (USBA, defeated defeated Willie Joyce) and Dave Castilloux (CBU, defeated Laurie Stevens). The matchmakers are hoping for a Berg-Arizmendi title bout, but Berg, who is now at Post-Prime, could decide accept a somewhat “easier” opponent such as Angott or Castilloux. The fact that some of the top 10 are past Prime means a chance for some guys like Montgomery and Mancini to move up. Unbeaten Ike Williams seems ready to move into a top contender spot and perhaps even win a title or two. Joe Brown is the best of the current prospects but still a couple of years away from breaking through. Freddie Dawson tops the class of newcomers slated to join the ranks in 1943.

Last edited by JCWeb; 12-28-2019 at 09:39 AM.
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Old 12-28-2019, 10:03 AM   #1354
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1942 - Featherweights

FW

Division Profile

Total: 116 RL: 73 TC: 43

RL by Career Stage:
End - 5
Post - 19
Prime - 25
Pre - 13
Beginning - 11 (6 New)

Rated: 57
800+: 10
500+: 36
200+ : 53

Jan 1943 Rankings (Perf Points and Changes from Jan. 1942 in Parens):

WBA Champ: Everett Rightmire 34-12-3 (14) (1102) (+26)
1. Petey Scalzo 24-3-2 (14) (1097) (+2)
2. Harold Hoshino 29-3-2 (16) (1079) (+2) (USBA)
3. Mike Belloise 31-13-7 (11) (1071) (+2) (NABF)
4. Chalky Wright 40-14-4 (15) (1070) (-3)
5. Freddie Miller 42-16-1 (15) (893) (+10)
6. Petey Sarron 40-23-6 (11) (888) (NC)
7. National Kid 21-2-1 (10) (887) (+13)
8. Battling Battalino 45-17-3 (16) (865) (+1)
9. Leo Rodak 28-12 (7) (857) (+3)
10. Frankie Covelli 35-17-9 (7) (793) (+1)

Other Notables: 11. Filio Julian Echevarria 41-18-5 (12) (785) (LABF)
12. Dave Crowley 34-25-1 (14) (782) (CBU, GBU)
14. Kid Chocolate 43-13-1 (17) (771)
17. Carlos Chavez 17-1 (7) (719)
18. Maurice Holtzer 45-22-5 (6) (711)
19. Willie Pep 15-0 (12) (674)
20. Eddie Miller 21-7-1 (9) (672) (OPBF)

Top Prospects: Phil Terranova 11-0 (7)
Ronnie Clayton 10-0 (8)
Ossie Rodriguez 6-0 (1)
Steve Kronis 4-0 (3)
Chico Rosa 1-0

Retirements:

Abie Israel (USA) 1926-1942 34-24-5 (14) No Titles Highest Rank: 17
Petey Hayes (USA) 1930-1942 26-15-9 (7) No Titles Highest Rank: 13
Varias Milling (PHI) 1927-1942 29-26-7 (11) No Titles Highest Rank: 43
Irving Eldridge (USA) 1933-1942 18-17-3 (10) No Titles Highest Rank: 46

Outlook for 1943: Well, no one would have predicted Rightmire’s rise from #26 in last year’s rankings to the top of the division in 1942, so I’m reluctant to make any predictions for 1943. However, Scalzo, who took the title and narrowly lost a SD to Rightmire, has a good chance to win it back, even if he is now at Post-Prime career stage. Hoshino and Belloise are also well poised for possible WBA title shots. With Arizmendi’s move up to LW, the situation has been left wide open, and with five of the top 10 contenders past their Prime years, there is plenty of opportunity for guys not currently in the top 10 to move up. National Kid has already established himself as a top contender, and it seems only a question of time before he becomes the LABF titleholder. Carlos Chavez and Willie Pep are on the verge of making a run at top contender status as well, despite the fact that both are still at Pre-Prime for a few more bouts. No superb prospects (like Willie Pep) waiting in the wings, at least in this year’s crop, with Ciro Morasen (a “6”) being the best of the newcomers.
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Old 12-29-2019, 05:51 PM   #1355
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1942 - Bantamweights

BW

Division Profile

Total: 89 RL: 53 TC: 36

RL by Career Stage:
End - 6
Post - 13
Prime - 21
Pre - 5
Beginning - 8 (1 New)

Rated: 43
800+: 17
500+: 32
200+ : 42

Jan 1943 Rankings (Perf Points and Changes from Jan. 1942 in Parens):

WBA Champ: Panama Al Brown 68-14-2 (25) (1245) (+1)
1. K. O. Morgan 37-13-8 (17) (1405) (-1)
2. Manuel Ortiz 21-4-1 (14) (1284) (+2)
3. David Kui Kong Young 26-1-2 (14) (1220) (+3) (NABF)
4. Johnny King 58-9-2 (22) (1147) (+4) (EBU, GBU)
5. Benny Goldberg 21-2-2 (10) (1144) (+12) (USBA)
6. Georgie Pace 29-12-2 (19) (1143) (-2)
7. Little Pancho 44-11-7 (10) (1138) (-5)
8. Raul Casanova 32-11-2 (15) (1087) (+4) (LABF)
9. Pablo Dano 41-17-6 (18) (1086) (-4)
10. Mickey Miller 32-11-2 (19) (995) (-7) (OPBF)

Other Notables: 11. Sixto Escobar 34-14-5 (10) (994)
12. Ritchie Tanner 18-5-2 (10) (897) (CBU)
13. Tommy Forte 26-4-2 (11) (871)
14. Kid Chocolate 43-13-1 (17) (771)
16. Lou Salica 27-10-4 (11) (831)
19. Tony Olivera 21-5-1 (15) (737)
20. Gus Foran 15-0 (11) (721)

Top Prospects: Lou Alter 11-0 (11)
Fernando Gagnon 4-0 (4)
Ossie Rodriguez 6-0 (1)
Luis Galvani 3-0 (2)
Harold Dade 2-0 (2)

Retirement:

Jo Teiken (KOR) 1931-1942 29-18-2 (16) No Titles Highest Rank: 14

Outlook for 1943: Looking back at last year’s forecast, seems I was a bit premature in predicting the decline of two long-time dominant BWs, Panama Al Brown and Johnny King, as both remain stalwarts in the division, with Panama Al once again regaining the WBA BW title. K. O. Morgan and Manuel Ortiz are in place as the top two contenders, both of whom are currently sporting a higher Perf Point total than the aging Brown. Kui Kong Young and Goldberg, each with a regional belt, are now looking to prove themselves in a WBA title encounter. There is opportunity for some lower rated guys to move up, given that four of the current top 10 (Pace, Little Pancho, Casanova and Dano) have hit Post-Prime career stage. Guys like Tanner (the new Commonwealth BW Champ) and Forte are well positioned to move up. Gus Foran, who has won his first 15, remains to be seriously tested. Feranando Gagnon, Luis Galvani and Harold Dade – the best of the young prospects – are still several years away from becoming top contenders. Only one new addition to the BW ranks in 1943 – Hiroshi Horiguchi – is only rated a “4.”
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Old 12-30-2019, 02:14 PM   #1356
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1942 - Flyweights

FLY

Division Profile

Total: 64 RL: 37 TC: 27

RL by Career Stage:
End - 1
Post - 9
Prime - 18
Pre - 5
Beginning - 4 (2 New)

Rated: 27
800+: 5
500+: 19
200+ : 23

Jan 1943 Rankings (Perf Points and Changes from Jan. 1942 in Parens):

WBA Champ: Jackie Jurich 25-3-1 (17) (1222) (NC)
1. Midget Wolgast 57-9-1 (19) (1102) (NC)
2. Peter Kane 25-4-1 (11) (950) (+3) (EBU)
3. Little Dado 28-4-1 (13) (928) (+3) (OPBF)
4. Jimmy Gill 32-9-4 (11) (823) (+10)
5. Istvan Enekes 38-13-2 (11) (757) (-3)
6. Teddy Gardner 18-2-1 (10) (761) (+5) (CBU)
7. Jackie Brown 40-19-5 (12) (724) (-3)
8. Valentin Angelmann 41-22-1 (15) (694) (-5)
9. Rinty Monaghan 30-8-1 (11) (694) (+1)
10. Raoul DeGryse 22-7-2 (13) (622) (+9)

Other Notables
: 11. Yoichiro Hanada 29-12-2 (8) (609)
12. Dado Marino 16-0 (11) (595)
17. Jackie Paterson 17-3-1 (13) (540) (GBU)
19. Mustapha Mustaphaoui 16-2-2 (6) (461)

Top Prospects: Emile Famechon 8-0 (8)
Maurice Sandeyron 7-0 (3)
Terry Allen 3-0

Retirements:

Young Perez (TUN) 1928-1942 30-20-5 (11) No Titles Highest Rank: 4
Benny Lynch (UK) 1931-1942 36-14 (18) CBU, GBU Champ Highest Rank: 2

Outlook for 1943: Well, another year in the books and Jackie Jurich has continued his reign as WBA Champ. Some veterans have faded away, notably Benny Lynch (who retired) and Jackie Brown (slipped in rankings, now at Post-Prime career stage). Yet, despite being at Post-Prime, ex-Champ Wolgast still is in place as the #1 contender and still a threat to regain the WBA crown. Two British fighters, Kane and Gardner, hold lesser title belts and are future title contenders; ditto for Jackie Paterson, although the latter is nowehere near as high in the rankings at the present time. Dado Marino is likely to move into the top 10, and perhaps will become a contender for the long dormant NABF and USBA titles. Terry Allen is the best of the young prospects, and the division will welcome two “7” rated guys -- Black Pico and Yoshio Shirai – in 1943.
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Old 12-30-2019, 03:11 PM   #1357
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Roll of Champions (as of January 1, 1943)

ROLL OF CHAMPIONS
(in Parens, date won title and number of title defenses)

HW

WBA: Joe Louis (Feb. 1939) (16)
NABF: Jersey Joe Walcott (Dec. 1940) (3)
USBA: Jack Trammell (Jan. 1941) (0)
CBU: Tommy Martin (Dec. 1939) (1)
GBU: Tommy Farr (Feb. 1942) (0)
EBU: Max Schmleing (Sep. 1939) (5)
OPBF: Vacant
LABF: Alberto Santiago Lovell (Nov. 1941) (1)

LH

WBA: Billy Conn (Mar. 1942) (0)
NABF: Archie Moore (Aug. 1942) (0)
USBA: Melio Bettina (Sep. 1941) (2)
CBU: Jack A. Johnson (Jul. 1941) (1)
GBU: Freddie Mills (Jan. 1940) (2)
EBU: Adolf Heuser (Oct. 1941) (2)
OPBF: Inactive
LABF: Inactive

MW

WBA: Holman Williams (Jun. 1942) (2)
NABF: Charley Burley (Jul. 1941) (5)
USBA: Allen Matthews (Jun. 1942) (0)
CBU: Lou Brouillard (Nov. 1939) (4)
GBU: Jock McAvoy (Oct. 1930) (12)
EBU: Marcel Cerdan (Aug. 1938) (9)
OPBF: Ron Richards (Sep. 1942) (0)
LABF: Jose Basora (Feb. 1942) (0)

WW

WBA: Henry Armstrong (Dec. 1939) (7)
NABF: Fritzie Zivic (Aug. 1941) (5)
USBA: Izzy Jannazzo (Mar. 1940) (6)
CBU: Ernie Roderick (Sep. 1941) (1)
GBU: Ernie Roderick (May 1935) (2)
EBU: Saviero Turiello (Aug. 1942) (0)
OPBF: Jack McNamee (Feb. 1939) (3)
LABF: Cocoa Kid (Jul. 1940) (2)

LW

WBA: Jack Kid Berg (May 1942) (1)
NABF: Baby Arizmendi (Mar. 1942) (1)
USBA: Sammy Angott (Oct. 1942) (1)
CBU: Dave Castilloux (Nov. 1942) (0)
GBU: Harry Mizler (Feb. 1937) (4)
EBU: Aldo Spoldi (Oct. 1941) (1)
OPBF: Inactive
LABF: Baby Arizmendi (Oct. 1942) (0)

FW

WBA: Everett Rightmire (Aug. 1942) (1)
NABF: Mike Belloise (Jul. 1942) (1)
USBA: Harold Hoshino (Sep. 1942) (0)
CBU: Dave Crowley (Oct. 1941) (0)
GBU: Dave Crowley (Jan. 1941) (1)
EBU: Maurice Holtzer (Aug. 1942) (0)
OPBF: Eddie Miller (Oct. 1932) (0)
LABF: Filio Julian Echevarria (Mar. 1940) (1)

BW

WBA: Panama Al Brown (Oct. 1942) (0)
NABF: David Kui Kong Young (Aug. 1941) (1)
USBA: Benny Goldberg (Nov. 1942) (0)
CBU: Ritchie Tanner (Jun. 1942) (0)
GBU: Johnny King (May 1942) (0)
EBU: Johnny King (Aug. 1940) (0)
OPBF: Mickey Miller (Jan. 1941) (0)
LABF: Raul Casanova (Nov. 1941) (0)

FLY

WBA: Jackie Jurich (Aug. 1940) (6)
NABF: Inactive
USBA: Inactive
CBU: Teddy Gardner (Oct. 1941) (1)
GBU: Jackie Paterson (Nov. 1942) (0)
EBU: Peter Kane (Dec. 1940) (3)
OPBF: Little Dado (Oct. 1941) (0)
LABF: Inactive
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Old 12-30-2019, 04:02 PM   #1358
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Great uni as always JC. Did Benny Lynch win any titles?
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Old 12-30-2019, 04:39 PM   #1359
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Benny Lynch ...

Titles? Yes, he held the Commonwealth Fly belt from 1939 to 1941 and the GBU (British) Fly title on three separate occasions, starting in 1935, and actually was holding it at the time of his retirement in 1942.

Benny had only one shot at the WBA title, in November 1939, but lost at UD 15 to Wolgast, the division's dominant Champion at the time.
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Old 12-30-2019, 05:11 PM   #1360
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Pound-for-Pound and Year End Awards

Finally, to wrap up the year-end review, here are the latest PFP rankings:

1942 Year-End Pound-for-Pound Rankings (changes from last year in parens)

1. Joe Louis, HW (WBA Champion), 2060 (+1)
2. Max Schmeling, HW (EBU Champion), 1924 (+2)
3. Henry Armstrong, WW (WBA Champion), 1803 (-2)
4. Holman Williams, MW (WBA Champion), 1791 (new)
5. Charley Burley, MW (NABF Champion), 1634 (new)
6. Jersey Joe Walcott, HW (NABF Champion), 1559 (+3)
7. Fritzie Zivic, WW (NABF Champion), 1553 (new)
8. Izzy Jannazzo, WW (USBA Champion), 1538 (new)
9. Marcel Cerdan, MW (EBU Champion), 1516 (new)
10. Baby Arizmendi, LW (NABF and LABF Champion), 1489 (new)

Dropped Out:
LW-WW Tony Canzoneri (was #3)
MW Tony Zale (was #5)
BW K. O. Morgan (was #6)
BW Panama Al Brown (was #7)
WW Cocoa Kid (was #8)
MW Teddy Yarosz (was #10)

Comments: Quite a few changes from last year's list, as several fighters who had been dominant declined in 1942. Schmeling (on the list 10 times) and Louis (now six times) have been there most often; Williams was on the list once before (in 1940) while the five others listed as "new" are true first-timers. It is interesting to note the slide of Brown, who lost to a couple of lower rated guys (almost a 500 Perf Point decline) before bouncing back near the end of the year to regain the WBA BW title. Also, interesting to note that the top 10 this year come from just three divisions (HW, MW and WW). Also, all 10 listed hold some form of title or another, another difference from the lists seen in recent years. Finally, Joe Louis' Perf Point total is the highest ever, and highest seen in any year-end PFP list thus far.

YEAR-END AWARDS

Fighter of the Year: Holman Williams
Fight of the Year: Panama Al Brown MD 15 Manuel Ortiz (WBA BW, Oct 31)
Top Newcomer: Jose Basora
Upset of the Year: Everett Rightmire SD 15 Petey Scalzo (WBA FW, Aug. 8)
Comeback of the Year: Panama Al Brown

Comments: Fighter of the Year was basically a two-person contest between Williams and Joe Louis. Louis was not tested and did not face the division's top contender, Max Schmeling and, although he hit the all-time statistical high measured in terms of Perf Points and won a notable matchup with LH Champ Billy Conn, he did have one blemish (a technical draw with Tommy Farr) that hurt his chances versus Williams, who had two impressive wins versus two all-time greats, Henry Armstrong and Tony Zale.
Fight of the Year was a really tough call. Three strong candidates that deserve honorable mention were Zale UD 15 Armstrong (WBA MW title, Feb. 21); Conn SD 15 Moore (WBA LH title, Mar. 21); and Williams UD 15 Zale (Jun. 23). Went with Brown's exciting win over Ortiz because it was a rematch and marked the fifth time Brown had claimed the WBA title; checked the books on this, and that ties him for the most times a fighter won a WBA title in the same division with ATG WW Jimmy McLarnin. Finally, I had to throw out the Conn-Moore bout for lack of details since that was part of a report that was accidentally deleted from my computer files. Sorry!
Selecting the Top Newcomer for 1942 was also tricky as there was no clear standout, and I decided to focus on quality wins in going with Basora, who despite losing his last two (kind of overreaching to take on the likes of Charley Burley, IMHO) after reeling off 19 in a row, his two victims (ex-Champ Freddie Steele in a non-title affair plus Antonio Fernandez for the LABF title) outweigh just focusing on an undefeated record. Thus, guys like 19-0 Norman Rubio (WW) and 17-0 Ike Williams (LW) lose out for lack of similar quality wins during the year.
Upset of the year, didn't think about this one very long, went with Rightmire's capture of the FW title as it was a surprise to see a "6" challenger overcome an "8" (Petey Scalzo) when the guy defending his title was still in Prime shape. Plus, Rightmire came out of nowhere in the topsy-turvy FW rankings to capture the title.
Finally, decided to add a new category, comeback fighter of the year, in honor of Panama Al's recapture of the WBA BW title at the ripe old age of 40 years young.
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